Sandwiches around the world

epicuric

Veteran
Staff member
Joined
12 Mar 2016
Local time
4:38 PM
Messages
2,475
Location
Shropshire, UK
lol, more.

I have had no end of issues with this one of the years. Hubby has finally stopped calling them muffins and barm cakes. He grew up with a Pie in barm (literally a pie in a bap). I know them as baps (conventional sized, soft top, floury), stotties (they are roughly 8-12 inches in diameter and usually divided up into wedges), rolls (conventional size, crusty, but never floury with a 'tear' across the top). To me a muffin was something sweet and cake like, a treat, not something that your sandwiches came in... I think the main one I use is bap. A bread roll to me is something oval in shape like a miniature baton in type, crusty and not suitable for sandwiches...

(I was born north of the border, family originate from Wales and Warrington of all places. Hubby and his family are from a little place near to Oldham.)
"Muffin" is a strange one. I think most people would think:
1570095251816.png

I seldom eat cakes, so would think:

1570095198122.png


Two totally different things.
 

caseydog

Active Member
Joined
25 Aug 2019
Local time
10:38 AM
Messages
635
Location
Dallas, TX
"Muffin" is a strange one. I think most people would think:
View attachment 32952
I seldom eat cakes, so would think:

View attachment 32951

Two totally different things.
Here in Merca, that second picture shows what we refer to as an "English Muffin." I have no Idea whether is actually relates to any real English bread product. That particular breakfast sandwich is very popular here. Looks like you have them in the UK, too, looking at the McD's UK menu.

The first photo shows what we call a muffin -- looks like a blueberry muffin.

CD
 

epicuric

Veteran
Staff member
Joined
12 Mar 2016
Local time
4:38 PM
Messages
2,475
Location
Shropshire, UK
Here in Merca, that second picture shows what we refer to as an "English Muffin." I have no Idea whether is actually relates to any real English bread product. That particular breakfast sandwich is very popular here. Looks like you have them in the UK, too, looking at the McD's UK menu.

The first photo shows what we call a muffin -- looks like a blueberry muffin.

CD
Yes, they are very popular here. I have spent the last hour wishing I hadn't googled that image!

Perhaps the one in the first pic originated in the US, and the one in the second pic originated in the UK? A quick look on wiki seems to support this.
 

morning glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Local time
4:38 PM
Messages
31,636
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
Yes, they are very popular here. I have spent the last hour wishing I hadn't googled that image!

Perhaps the one in the first pic originated in the US, and the one in the second pic originated in the UK? A quick look on wiki seems to support this.
They are based on the original English muffin as sold be "the muffin man" - remember the nursery rhyme? This photo is London 1910. The bell was rung to herald his arrival on your street.

32958
 

Kenmiller

Regular Member
Joined
3 May 2019
Local time
10:08 PM
Messages
106
Location
Mohali, India
We personally use multigrain slices of bread, garlic breads, brown breads and sometimes white bread to make different varieties of sandwiches. Have you ever heard about bread pizza? if yes then its great because this is very common at our weekends. And else that veg sandwich and sandwich of leftover gravies or any cooked vegetable is also is good going at midnight hunger.
 

Karen W

Senior Member
Joined
30 Jul 2018
Local time
8:38 AM
Messages
1,299
Location
.
[Mod. Edit: The following few posts moved to form a new thread]

TastyReuben said about sandwiches in the UK:



You mean in them? What else would they have?
Not too clear on the question? Didn't see previous posts. Re butter in sandwiches, first thing that comes to mind are tea sandwiches. British in origin, yes? Tiny sandwiches with crusts cut off and served with tea, scones, petit fours. Watercress or dill, cucumbers and butter, roast beef. Cream cheese in place of butter. I do like a steak topped with a pat of (compound) butter, or a hamburger topped with same, on occasion. Buttered buns for burgers. I can hear my arteries clogging. Off-hand, can't think of any sandwiches in the US that include butter. Usually it's a spread like mayo, ketchup, mustard, or cream cheese.
 
Last edited:

rascal

Veteran
Joined
18 Mar 2018
Local time
5:38 AM
Messages
5,826
Location
Christchurch New Zealand
Here's a sammy I just made half an hour ago. I normally have with bread but none. Wife's seed bread, tomato relish, egg , cheese, bacon, cheese and BBQ sauce. Toasted under grill/ broiler.
Was 10/10. I need to make these more!!

Russ

33314
 
Top Bottom