Steak names

rascal

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I only buy three types and they are called porterhouse fillet and rump. Rumps pretty much where it's from, I use in casseroles stews and that type of foods.
Now here we have the porterhouse and fillet, both from the t bone. The small inner piece is the fillet and the outer is the porterhouse. Now this is where the muricans come in. I believe you call the porterhouse sirloin? And the fillet the tenderloin.?? Correct me if I'm wrong.!!
I'm seeing more and more porterhouse being labelled sirloin in the shops now.

Russ
 

epicuric

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I only buy three types and they are called porterhouse fillet and rump. Rumps pretty much where it's from, I use in casseroles stews and that type of foods.
Now here we have the porterhouse and fillet, both from the t bone. The small inner piece is the fillet and the outer is the porterhouse. Now this is where the muricans come in. I believe you call the porterhouse sirloin? And the fillet the tenderloin.?? Correct me if I'm wrong.!!
I'm seeing more and more porterhouse being labelled sirloin in the shops now.

Russ
The T-bone and porterhouse are the same thing, just taken from different ends of the short rib. Therefore, the overall size and relative size of each side is different. The larger side is the sirloin (I believe this is known as strip steak in the US?) the other is the fillet steak (tenderloin in the US?), sometimes known as filet mignon when taken from the T-bone. In Aus/NZ you see the sirloin part alone of the porterhouse referred to as a porterhouse steak. In the UK it is unusual to see the term porterhouse used, it's mostly all referred to as T-bone. Confused yet?
 

caseydog

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Yes, in the US, we call the larger side either a strip steak, or a NY strip. If you buy just that part, it will be labeled a NY Strip.

The smaller side is usually referred to as the filet, here.

And, yes, a porterhouse and t-bone are different ends of the same chunk of beef, with the porterhouse having a substantially bigger filet. A cheap t-bone will often be cut thinner, and have very little filet.

CD
 

MrsDangermouse

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Beef cuts vary between all countries I've found - this is the reference I use to try to make some sense of it all.

At home we tend to buy ribeye, rump or sirloin. Ribeye is my favourite for flavour and texture, but rump and sirloin can also be good too - the quality of the meat and how long its been hung is just as important as the cut. Very occasionally we'll have a T-bone - in fact we'll

On holiday in the supermarket if we don't recognise the names of the cuts we go by the look of the meat - though whilst its pretty easy to tell which one is a ribeye, but visually differentiating between rump and sirloin is more difficult because they tend to be trimmed differently to what we're used to seeing at home.

When eating out in France if I fancy steak-frites I tend to go for the bavette which is actually a pretty cheap cut (it comes from the same place as our skirt steak) and is pretty tough so it has to be prepared properly: cut relatively thin, beaten out a bit and served rare. Though its not the most tender steak, its probably one of the most flavoursome. :hungry:
 

Morning Glory

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Beef cuts vary between all countries I've found - this is the reference I use to try to make some sense of it all.
Yes - I sort sighed when I saw this new thread! Names for cuts of meat in general are a mine of confusion across countries.

When eating out in France if I fancy steak-frites I tend to go for the bavette
Prior to lockdown I noticed Waitrose were selling bavette (pre-packed). It was fairly cheap, too.
 

caseydog

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Beef cuts vary between all countries I've found - this is the reference I use to try to make some sense of it all.

At home we tend to buy ribeye, rump or sirloin. Ribeye is my favourite for flavour and texture, but rump and sirloin can also be good too - the quality of the meat and how long its been hung is just as important as the cut. Very occasionally we'll have a T-bone - in fact we'll

On holiday in the supermarket if we don't recognise the names of the cuts we go by the look of the meat - though whilst its pretty easy to tell which one is a ribeye, but visually differentiating between rump and sirloin is more difficult because they tend to be trimmed differently to what we're used to seeing at home.

When eating out in France if I fancy steak-frites I tend to go for the bavette which is actually a pretty cheap cut (it comes from the same place as our skirt steak) and is pretty tough so it has to be prepared properly: cut relatively thin, beaten out a bit and served rare. Though its not the most tender steak, its probably one of the most flavoursome. :hungry:
It is called skirt steak here, too. It has great flavor, but it has to be cooked hot and fast, no more than medium rare. Sliced thin against the grain.

The Mexican word for skirt steak is fajita. Soooo, technically, if you say chicken fajitas, you are saying " chicken skirt steak." But, now it refers to the taco-like food with any kind of meat -- or vegetables -- in TexMex cuisine. The word has evolved.

CD

Ribeye is my favorite cut of steak, too.
 
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