The secret to light and fluffy omelettes and scrambled eggs.

flyinglentris

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Back in my 20s, I discovered, quite by accident, the secret of making light fluffy Omelettes and Scrambled Eggs - steam.

It's very easy. Prior to frying your Omelette or Scrambleds, just add some Milk. When the Eggs fry, the Milk in them steams and creates a sort of leavening effect, causing the eggs to rise with air pockets from the steam. It's just that simple.

I wish I could post photos, showing a normal Omelette and an Omelette with Milk added, but alas, I just don't have any Milk in the Fridge.

But it's an easy comparison that anyone can do.
 
IF and WHEN I have milk in my house, I do add a dollop or two to omelets. This does make them fluffier. I seldom have milk in the house, however. (But I do, today... haven't had breakfast yet... hmmmm...)

If you can, post some comparison photos.
 
Freeze heavy cream in ice cube trays or shot glasses. When your egg are to your liking, take of heat and whisk in the frozen cream .It stops them cooking on and going grainy.
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Freeze heavy cream in ice cube trays or shot glasses. When your egg are to your liking, take of heat and whisk in the frozen cream .It stops them cooking on and going grainy.

I'm not sure what to make of this suggestion. Your photo has Scrambled Eggs that look kind of gooey, not grainy.
 
I'm not sure what to make of this suggestion. Your photo has Scrambled Eggs that look kind of gooey, not grainy.
Thats how I like them soft and creamy. If I had not added the frozen cream they would have cooked on and become grainy. I don't want them to look like this. Dry and overcooked. Which of these would you prefer?
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Back in my 20s, I discovered, quite by accident, the secret of making light fluffy Omelettes and Scrambled Eggs - steam.

It's very easy. Prior to frying your Omelette or Scrambleds, just add some Milk. When the Eggs fry, the Milk in them steams and creates a sort of leavening effect, causing the eggs to rise with air pockets from the steam. It's just that simple.

I wish I could post photos, showing a normal Omelette and an Omelette with Milk added, but alas, I just don't have any Milk in the Fridge.

But it's an easy comparison that anyone can do.

I use milk in all my eggs unless I'm using them in baking or as part of breading. My father was in the military before I was born and he always added milk to eggs. I never asked him why. I just started doing it when I taught myself to cook. It's funny how we sometimes do things for no reason other than our parents did them.
 
Thats how I like them soft and creamy. If I had not added the frozen cream they would have cooked on and become grainy. I don't want them to look like this. Dry and overcooked. Which of these would you prefer?View attachment 51295View attachment 51296
I would definitely go with the second, I really don't like overcooked scrambled eggs. I also like them quite rich, so never add milk or cream, but often add an additional egg yolk.
 
Back in my 20s, I discovered, quite by accident, the secret of making light fluffy Omelettes and Scrambled Eggs - steam.

It's very easy. Prior to frying your Omelette or Scrambleds, just add some Milk. When the Eggs fry, the Milk in them steams and creates a sort of leavening effect, causing the eggs to rise with air pockets from the steam. It's just that simple.

I wish I could post photos, showing a normal Omelette and an Omelette with Milk added, but alas, I just don't have any Milk in the Fridge.

But it's an easy comparison that anyone can do.

We use to have Frittata instead of omelette (similar yet different) and what I’ve learned by my mom for getting frittata more fluffy, is to separate whites from yolks, then whip the whites until firm and add them to the beaten yolks.

Or also the addition of milk like you do or a bit of heavy cream
 
Thats how I like them soft and creamy. If I had not added the frozen cream they would have cooked on and become grainy. I don't want them to look like this. Dry and overcooked. Which of these would you prefer?

I suppose you and I are at opposite poles on this. I like the drier scrambleds.
 
I just made the omelet with the milk (Whole milk). The appearance isn't of sufficient difference than the milk-less ones so no photo, but they are fluffier and indeed better than when I don't have milk in the house.

As for the scrambled, I will make some tomorrow for breakfast. I don't like tiny little curds, I like larger hunks of egg. They aren't at all grainy that way, whether milk or not. They are best if I can throw in a duck egg - but none available right now. (More yolk per egg...)
 
I'm not sure what to make of this suggestion. Your photo has Scrambled Eggs that look kind of gooey, not grainy.

Adding ice cold butter is the trick a lot of chefs use to halt the cooking and the iced cream serves a similar purpose. There is a problem here though with discussing this. American scrambled eggs tend to be far more cooked than in the UK. We tend to go for very creamy loose scramble. This is a generalisation of course, but I know when I see photos of American scrambled eggs they almost always look very overcooked to me.

In fact my scramble is looser than Burt Blank's.
 
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