Using sous vide to decrystallize honey

caseydog

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I like to buy fresh, local honey. They say it is good for allergies, but to me, it just tastes good.

But, it will crystalize in the pantry.

I use my sous vide setup decrystallize the honey.

I just set the sous vide to 110F, and let the bottle of honey soak for an hour or so, and it comes back to its normal, liquid state.

Another use for sous vide.
 

rascal

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I like to buy fresh, local honey. They say it is good for allergies, but to me, it just tastes good.

But, it will crystalize in the pantry.

I use my sous vide setup decrystallize the honey.

I just set the sous vide to 110F, and let the bottle of honey soak for an hour or so, and it comes back to its normal, liquid state.

Another use for sous vide.
Don't have a sous vide, not big on honey, but I'm told Manuka honey is very healing. It's expensive here. It seems most goes to China.?

Russ
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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I just warm it up in the microwave. Works well but warming honey up via any method needs to be done carefully. Like all jams, jellies and sweet sauces, honey can suddenly spit and bubble and will cause really bad burns if it comes into contact with your skin even at seemingly very low temperatures.
 

Mountain Cat

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I bought a sous vide a year and a half ago. I've not used it for honey but I can see just putting the jar in a pot of hot water and keeping the temps low enough can work for that. I don't have any need for crystalized honey - I usually need to measure out a tablespoon or so, and therefore do want it liquid for that.

I only buy local honey - much of the commercial stuff has dodgy backgrounds. And, not being a sweet tooth, I really don't eat it much.

I've discovered that I really like sous vide for chicken breast - you can find just the right temperature that the meat is COOKED, and before it turns tastelessly dry - and the whole thing can be cooked to the same temp, so you aren't overcooking the exterior to get the interior done right.

For steaks - only works if the steaks or roasts are tough, or if they are very thick - browning them after seems to defeat the point in sous viding a thin tasty tender steak. I was also not impressed with my salmon sous vide experiment. It tasted good... but why bother when pan frying them or baking them is just so much easier and at least as good?
 

Mountain Cat

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The honey I buy doesn't crystallize in the pantry.
I have two jars of honey given to me over a decade ago by a co-worker from his own hives. Yes, this crystalizes. I do use it occasionally, but you can tell if I still have honey that old (no it doesn't go "bad") it WILL crystalize.

I wouldn't trust nor eat that honey that comes in those little plastic bears.
 

CraigC

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I have two jars of honey given to me over a decade ago by a co-worker from his own hives. Yes, this crystalizes. I do use it occasionally, but you can tell if I still have honey that old (no it doesn't go "bad") it WILL crystalize.

I wouldn't trust nor eat that honey that comes in those little plastic bears.
I buy honey in 1/2 gallon jugs from the actual producer in Labelle, Florida. Orange Blossom honey.
 

Mountain Cat

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I buy honey in 1/2 gallon jugs from the actual producer in Labelle, Florida. Orange Blossom honey.
WOW. You go through more honey in a half gallon than I'll probably ever use in a lifetime! (I assume yours is also typically for more than one person, however.)

I do plan to start honeybees here in a couple of years - I want the bees for pollination, and I'd sell the honey. I guess my weakness is real maple syrup (which I also plan to start harvesting this coming winter), but even that - a couple spoonfuls on my occasional pancakes is plenty.

At any rate, your orange blossom honey sounds good and healthy.
 

CraigC

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WOW. You go through more honey in a half gallon than I'll probably ever use in a lifetime! (I assume yours is also typically for more than one person, however.)

I do plan to start honeybees here in a couple of years - I want the bees for pollination, and I'd sell the honey. I guess my weakness is real maple syrup (which I also plan to start harvesting this coming winter), but even that - a couple spoonfuls on my occasional pancakes is plenty.

At any rate, your orange blossom honey sounds good and healthy.
I use a lot of pure maple syrup in a BBQ sauce I make.
 

caseydog

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I bought a sous vide a year and a half ago. I've not used it for honey but I can see just putting the jar in a pot of hot water and keeping the temps low enough can work for that. I don't have any need for crystalized honey - I usually need to measure out a tablespoon or so, and therefore do want it liquid for that.

I only buy local honey - much of the commercial stuff has dodgy backgrounds. And, not being a sweet tooth, I really don't eat it much.

I've discovered that I really like sous vide for chicken breast - you can find just the right temperature that the meat is COOKED, and before it turns tastelessly dry - and the whole thing can be cooked to the same temp, so you aren't overcooking the exterior to get the interior done right.

For steaks - only works if the steaks or roasts are tough, or if they are very thick - browning them after seems to defeat the point in sous viding a thin tasty tender steak. I was also not impressed with my salmon sous vide experiment. It tasted good... but why bother when pan frying them or baking them is just so much easier and at least as good?
I'm taking my own thread off-topic, but try steak again, when using a thicker cut. If you like medium-rare, you get it from edge to edge. A quick, hot sear puts a thin crisp layer on the outside that tastes great. Here is a fairly inexpensive sirloin, but I use it regularly for coice and prime cuts, like ribeye and tenderloin.

SteakSousVide.jpg


CD
 

caseydog

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There are other ways to recrystalize honey, I just already have the sous vide setup, and using it is so easy. Turn it on, put the bottle in the water, walk away for an hour or so. I would also think it would be safer that a microwave oven. They leave some areas cold, while others are molten lava hot.

I wouldn't go buy a sous vide circulator just for this task, but if you already have one, here is another way to use it.

CD
 

rascal

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There are other ways to recrystalize honey, I just already have the sous vide setup, and using it is so easy. Turn it on, put the bottle in the water, walk away for an hour or so. I would also think it would be safer that a microwave oven. They leave some areas cold, while others are molten lava hot.

I wouldn't go buy a sous vide circulator just for this task, but if you already have one, here is another way to use it.

CD
Hmmm, I'm thinking maybe get one or hint to the daughter????

Russ
 

caseydog

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Hmmm, I'm thinking maybe get one or hint to the daughter????

Russ
I got one as an chistmas gift from my dad. He got interested, so I gave him one the following chistmas. He loves it.

If you like to experiment with new things in the kitchen, start dropping those hints. :chef:

CD
 

morning glory

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I'm taking my own thread off-topic, but try steak again, when using a thicker cut. If you like medium-rare, you get it from edge to edge. A quick, hot sear puts a thin crisp layer on the outside that tastes great. Here is a fairly inexpensive sirloin, but I use it regularly for coice and prime cuts, like ribeye and tenderloin.

View attachment 31385

CD
That looks fab. Perhaps we need a new thread about sous-vide as there are at least three of us!
 
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