What produce/ingredients did you buy or obtain today?

rascal

Veteran
Joined
18 Mar 2018
Local time
1:33 AM
Messages
5,152
Location
Christchurch New Zealand
Went to my local Indian supermarket in weekend, no date and tamarind chutney. No hampa brand foods at all. Giggle was no help either so I decided to ring the shop and ask why they stopped selling that brand. They said they had just run out, thats all. New stock arriving next week. Wahoo. I will be stocking up with lots of this. It really is heaven as a condiment.

Russ
 

Windigo

Regular Member
Joined
29 Jul 2019
Local time
2:33 PM
Messages
220
Location
The Netherlands
Got my order of Swedish chocolate with liqourice from a brand called Lakritz. It's white chocolate dusted with fruit powder and has a small salty piece of liqourice in the middle. I love it, but it must be aquired taste.
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

Site Owner
Staff member
Joined
11 Oct 2012
Local time
11:33 PM
Messages
11,610
Location
A Pom in NSW, Aus
Website
www.satnavsaysstraighton.com
I love it, but it must be aquired taste.
I haven't worked out how it is an acquired taste at all. I hate salted liquorice... I can't see how anyone could actually have enough of it to acquire it as a taste! (I have travelled widely through Scandinavia as a whole through much of my childhood and adult years, but Sweden in particular (as well as having Swedish friends. I also had my honeymoon in Stockholm in winter!)
 

TastyReuben

Senior Member
Joined
15 Jul 2019
Local time
8:33 AM
Messages
1,471
Location
Ohio, US
but Sweden in particular (as well as having Swedish friends. I also had my honeymoon in Stockholm in winter!)
When we first moved overseas (UK), we bought a Volvo through US diplomat sales, and it included a trip to Gothenburg to pick it up. It was also extended by a couple of days because we did it over Christmas.

We. Had. A blast! It was the first truly "foreign" place we visited, and we stayed at a posh hotel right downtown and everything was decorated for the holiday.

I still remember our first meal in the hotel - it was the first time I'd ever gotten food that was plated artistically, and we both got such a giggle at the carrots; they were the thickness of school pencils, then halved lengthwise, and we got precisely three halves each, arranged like a peace sign with a little 3oz piece of beef in the middle. The only word for it was "precious."

Anyway, I bought some ground turkey yesterday, giving it maybe its fifth or so tryout in the house, planning on mixing it half-and-half with lean ground beef for sloppy joes.
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

Site Owner
Staff member
Joined
11 Oct 2012
Local time
11:33 PM
Messages
11,610
Location
A Pom in NSW, Aus
Website
www.satnavsaysstraighton.com
When we first moved overseas (UK), we bought a Volvo through US diplomat sales, and it included a trip to Gothenburg to pick it up. It was also extended by a couple of days because we did it over Christmas.

We. Had. A blast! It was the first truly "foreign" place we visited, and we stayed at a posh hotel right downtown and everything was decorated for the holiday.

I still remember our first meal in the hotel - it was the first time I'd ever gotten food that was plated artistically, and we both got such a giggle at the carrots; they were the thickness of school pencils, then halved lengthwise, and we got precisely three halves each, arranged like a peace sign with a little 3oz piece of beef in the middle. The only word for it was "precious."

Anyway, I bought some ground turkey yesterday, giving it maybe its fifth or so tryout in the house, planning on mixing it half-and-half with lean ground beef for sloppy joes.
I remember our very first trip to Sweden very clearly as well. It was in the days when the ferries still went to Sweden and in the days when they went from the port of Felixstow not Harwich (in the UK). And in the days before the car port doors had to be closed and sealed before you left the harbour walls (that law came in after the tragedy at Zeebrugge, I had been on a school trip out to that port just days before). To say it was a very rough crossing of the North Sea would be putting it mildly. I know the ferry wasn't very big by modern standards and was only 10 decks or maybe 11, but the swimming pool on the top deck was surrounded on all sides by a high (20 foot?) windbreak. All access to all decks except for the top deck was closed because of the waves breaking over the ship decks... the top deck was still receiving spray from the surf and the pool was obviously closed. It lacked the concept of water for the most part because the water had left the pool of its own accord... my brother and ex-step-father were very ill as were most passengers but my mother and i were not. Looking back at the photos, i never really appreciated that the green t-shirt I was wearing at the time might not have helped some of the other passengers! It was the only time my parents every had the cheap cabin (though we did have a cabin unlike some others who were sleeping under the stairs - something that is now not permitted). It was a shared cabin, think of a bunkhouse just at sea and mixed sex, mixed age and no bathroom, sectioned off with a curtain. It was also first come first served and if you left and someone of the family wasn't there, you had to take everything with you and know that you would not have those beds when you came back! those were the days of cheap travel to Scandinavia before it became a must go to location. They were great fun though.
 

rascal

Veteran
Joined
18 Mar 2018
Local time
1:33 AM
Messages
5,152
Location
Christchurch New Zealand
I remember our very first trip to Sweden very clearly as well. It was in the days when the ferries still went to Sweden and in the days when they went from the port of Felixstow not Harwich (in the UK). And in the days before the car port doors had to be closed and sealed before you left the harbour walls (that law came in after the tragedy at Zeebrugge, I had been on a school trip out to that port just days before). To say it was a very rough crossing of the North Sea would be putting it mildly. I know the ferry wasn't very big by modern standards and was only 10 decks or maybe 11, but the swimming pool on the top deck was surrounded on all sides by a high (20 foot?) windbreak. All access to all decks except for the top deck was closed because of the waves breaking over the ship decks... the top deck was still receiving spray from the surf and the pool was obviously closed. It lacked the concept of water for the most part because the water had left the pool of its own accord... my brother and ex-step-father were very ill as were most passengers but my mother and i were not. Looking back at the photos, i never really appreciated that the green t-shirt I was wearing at the time might not have helped some of the other passengers! It was the only time my parents every had the cheap cabin (though we did have a cabin unlike some others who were sleeping under the stairs - something that is now not permitted). It was a shared cabin, think of a bunkhouse just at sea and mixed sex, mixed age and no bathroom, sectioned off with a curtain. It was also first come first served and if you left and someone of the family wasn't there, you had to take everything with you and know that you would not have those beds when you came back! those were the days of cheap travel to Scandinavia before it became a must go to location. They were great fun though.
Sort of off topic, but Sweden.... What's your take on the 16 girl at the un.I don't know many swedes!

Russ
 

TastyReuben

Senior Member
Joined
15 Jul 2019
Local time
8:33 AM
Messages
1,471
Location
Ohio, US
When we crossed the North Sea (in 1992), the funny/embarrassing thing that happened to us was that neither one of us had ever seen or ever even heard of a duvet. Quilts...bedspreads...blankets...covers, sure - but not a duvet.

The closest thing would be a down comforter, but any down comforters we ever grew up with didn't have a separate cover over it, it was just like a self-contained thing.

The cabin had two single beds, and we both spent about 20 minutes debating whether we were supposed to sleep under this duvet thingy, or were supposed to unbutton it and use it like a sleeping bag.

One of us chose the former, and one of us chose the latter, and that's all I'm saying about that. :whistling:
 

Windigo

Regular Member
Joined
29 Jul 2019
Local time
2:33 PM
Messages
220
Location
The Netherlands
I haven't worked out how it is an acquired taste at all. I hate salted liquorice... I can't see how anyone could actually have enough of it to acquire it as a taste! (I have travelled widely through Scandinavia as a whole through much of my childhood and adult years, but Sweden in particular (as well as having Swedish friends. I also had my honeymoon in Stockholm in winter!)
Well, Dutch people grow up with it. Just like Swedish and Finnish people do and we love it. So I think that explains it. Maybe it's genetic.
 
Top Bottom