Who doesn't like curry?

rascal

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[Mod.Edit: this post & following few posts moved from another thread to start new topic]

If everyone likes curry that is a great idea. You can do samosas, pakoras etc for starters.

I did curry (fennel rice, onion pakoras, popadoms, two types of chutney, tarka dahl, chickpea dish, cauliflower dish. (All home made apart from the popadoms). Everyone was suprised when I said it was all vegan. I usually make one meat dish when we have guests but I forgot!
I agree with curries, who doesn't like them?

Russ
 
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morning glory

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Ummm, me. :whistling:

CD

Curries can vary so much - from hot vindaloo to mild aromatic dishes with no chilli at all - India is a huge country with many different cuisines and the word 'curry' doesn't really mean very much in terms of defining a dish. When I hear folk say they don't like curry I always think its a bit like saying they don't like casseroles. And I always get the urge to cook them a curry that will change their mind! :laugh:
 

Herbie

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Yes, it is an all encompassing term used for any savoury dish that uses spice and generally people think of hot spice as @morning glory says. Quite a poor classification for a huge variety of cuisines and dishes.
I mainly cook Pakistani 'curry' but also Indian and Thai, also a jamaican curry and a couple of Mauritian dishes that could be described as curry.
 

caseydog

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It is not the heat. It is the flavors. I don't like the flavors of most Asian foods. I do like some Korean foods, though. Japanese flavors are my least liked. The Asian palate and mine are just wired differently.

CD
 

TastyReuben

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It is not the heat. It is the flavors. I don't like the flavors of most Asian foods. I do like some Korean foods, though. Japanese flavors are my least liked. The Asian palate and mine are just wired differently.

CD
That's how my wife is. She doesn't like typical North African flavors, for example. She hates Indian food...Turkish cuisine, Middle Eastern cuisine.

That's not to say there aren't some things, should she explore those more deeply, that she'd enjoy, but her feeling is, "Why trudge through miles of stuff I don't like, to find those one or two items I do like, when there're already plenty of things I know I like?"

I can't blame her, really. Out there somewhere is possibly a mushroom dish that I'd like, but as of yet, I haven't found it, and the taste, odor, and texture of mushrooms in general so repulsive, that I don't care to go searching for it. :)
 

morning glory

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Its so strange to me that some people don't like certain flavours on such a broad scale - I don't think there is any 'category' cuisine I dislike. All flavours are exciting to me and especially, combinations of flavours. I can understand not liking a particular item of food. There are some that I'm not keen on (but will eat). But a whole category of cuisine and flavours puzzles me a bit.

To take North African food as an example. Much used spices in North African foods are: saffron, nutmeg, cinnamon, paprika, cloves and cumin. All of those spices are used in Western style cooking too. So is it the case that all these spices are disliked by those who dislike North African food? Or is it something else?
 

TastyReuben

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@morning glory - speaking for my wife, it's more the combination of those spices, especially as far as NoAf foods go, though I will say, she's no fan of cumin at all, and when I do use that (in chili, for example), I always cut the amount by half, if not more.

Curry powder, the generalized stuff we buy at the big market, and what frequently appears in dressed-up chicken salads...that'll turn her stomach just to smell it, so anything that has that hint of curry powder odor, she's not able to tolerate.

We all have our differences, though. She loves seafood, and I can't even stomach the smell of it, fresh-caught or being prepared. I felt terribly a few years ago when she said she wanted to go to a spendy posh seafood place for her birthday, and I thought it would be fine, they had beef and chicken dishes, but sitting at the bar for a drink beforehand, I was noticeably queasy and we had to leave before I decorated the bar with my lunch.

Now, the only times she gets seafood are the times she's away from home without me, and that's when I get some nice Indian food or kofta, so it all works out.
 

caseydog

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@morning glory - speaking for my wife, it's more the combination of those spices, especially as far as NoAf foods go, though I will say, she's no fan of cumin at all, and when I do use that (in chili, for example), I always cut the amount by half, if not more.

Curry powder, the generalized stuff we buy at the big market, and what frequently appears in dressed-up chicken salads...that'll turn her stomach just to smell it, so anything that has that hint of curry powder odor, she's not able to tolerate.

We all have our differences, though. She loves seafood, and I can't even stomach the smell of it, fresh-caught or being prepared. I felt terribly a few years ago when she said she wanted to go to a spendy posh seafood place for her birthday, and I thought it would be fine, they had beef and chicken dishes, but sitting at the bar for a drink beforehand, I was noticeably queasy and we had to leave before I decorated the bar with my lunch.

Now, the only times she gets seafood are the times she's away from home without me, and that's when I get some nice Indian food or kofta, so it all works out.

With few exceptions (like sushi), I love seafood. It is not the raw part that bothers me about sushi, it is the flavors common to Japanese food.

I use cumin, but sparingly. It is pretty potent -- a little goes a long way. I also use cilantro sparingly -- mostly in salsas as a minor element. On its own, it tastes like soap to me.

North African and Middle-Eastern food is hit-or-miss with me.

CD
 

morning glory

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I also use cilantro sparingly -- mostly in salsas as a minor element. On its own, it tastes like soap to me.
That's a well known phenomenon and its genetic. There is a significant minority of people for whom coriander leaves (cilantro) taste 'soapy'. Apparently such people have a variation in a group of olfactory-receptor genes that allows them to strongly perceive certain aldehydes. Where you grow up and exposure to the herb can also be a factor according to https://www.news-medical.net/health/The-Genetics-of-Corianders-Soapy-Taste.aspx

About 14–21% of people of East Asian, African, and Caucasian origin dislike coriander, while only 3–7% of people of South Asian, Hispanic, or Middle Eastern origin dislike it. The environment or culture in which one grows up could be a reason for this, as an environment is known to have a significant effect on the number of cells that are able to identify each smell or taste.
 

morning glory

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With few exceptions (like sushi), I love seafood. It is not the raw part that bothers me about sushi, it is the flavors common to Japanese food.
I love seafood too - no problem with sushi although it wouldn't be top of my list. What are the flavours you are referring to in Japanese food? I'm no expert on that cuisine... I immediately think Wasabi, soy sauce and Yuzu juice.
 

Karen W

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Re curries/curry, I could take it, or leave it. Not a huge fan. It's okay. I have a feeling it's more popular in the UK than the US, since I've seen it mentioned here quite a bit. Either that, or it's not a cuisine I grew up eating. A date took me to an Indian restaurant years ago. I liked the food, but don't know the dishes, since he did all the ordering. Indian cuisine was popular here for awhile. I made a dish with curry and raisins long ago. Chicken perhaps. Don't recall what it was. I liked it, but it left the kitchen smelling like Indian food take out. Never revisited the cuisine again.
 
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