Recipe Yorky Porkie Thai Chili Burgers

caseydog

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YorkyBurger001.jpg


This burger was inspired by our resident "Burger King," Yorky. It is NOT a copy of a Yorky pork burger. It is my interpretation.

The patty is ground pork, with diced shallot, garlic and sliced Thai chilis -- mixed into the meat, and rested overnight in the fridge. Instead of ketchup, I made a Sriracha Mayo for the top and bottom bun. Of course, there is "grass." On top of the burger is pickled carrots and cucumbers.

The chili heat was bordering on too much for me, so probably not enough for Yorky. :pepper:

Pickled Carrots and Cucumbers

2 Cups Rice Vinegar (Substitution: Apple Cider Vinegar)
1/2 Cup sugar
1 Cup Carrots sliced into toothpicks
1 Cup shaved cucumber ribbons

Combine Vinegar and Sugar, heat to dissolve sugar. Add Carrots and Cucumbers. Refrigerate for at least four hours.

Burger Patties

1 Pound Ground Pork (three to four patties, depending on your preference in size)
6 Thai Chills (Substitute: Cayenne Peppers) More or less to taste.
6 Cloves minced Garlic
6 finely diced Shallots
(please note, the 666 was not intentional -- not responsible for demonic possession of your burgers) :devil:

1 TBSP Thai Fish Sauce
Salt and White Pepper -- just a few dashes

Sriracha Mayo

1/2 cup Mayo
Sriracha -- add and stir until it is the right heat level for you

Hamburger Buns
Lettuce (AKA Grass)

Assembly (bottom to top)

Bottom Bun
Sriracha Mayo
Lettuce
Pork Patty
Pickled Carrots and Cucumbers
Sriracha Mayo on Top Bun

YorkyBurger002.jpg


CD
 
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The Late Night Gourmet

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This looks amazing. And, great name....very catchy! I can see why the pepper-to-meat ratio might be on the ragged edge of Face Melting, so I think I would scale that back (or use pickled peppers as a topping later that I can adjust as needed).

BTW, as I have posted before, I hate carrots. But, soak them in vinegar and sugar overnight, and they actually taste good. Who knew? :scratchhead:

CD
You are one step closer to liking kimchi than you realize. I don't happen to love all kimchi, and maybe that's been your issue. I bought some at an Asian market that was just soggy cabbage smeared with a pepper paste. The cooks were lazy! If you've had that kind of kimchi before, I can understand why you're not a fan. medtran49 and I have both posted kimchi recipes here that feature daikon radish and carrots. Maybe this is the first step toward a breakthrough? :laugh:
 

caseydog

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This looks amazing. And, great name....very catchy! I can see why the pepper-to-meat ratio might be on the ragged edge of Face Melting, so I think I would scale that back (or use pickled peppers as a topping later that I can adjust as needed).


You are one step closer to liking kimchi than you realize. I don't happen to love all kimchi, and maybe that's been your issue. I bought some at an Asian market that was just soggy cabbage smeared with a pepper paste. The cooks were lazy! If you've had that kind of kimchi before, I can understand why you're not a fan. medtran49 and I have both posted kimchi recipes here that feature daikon radish and carrots. Maybe this is the first step toward a breakthrough? :laugh:

I've never actually had kimchi, so I don't know if I would like it, or not. I have heard before that kimchi varies a lot, depending on who makes it and how. I've heard that the kimchi that goes in a clay pot and gets buried in the ground can be "pungent." I'll eventually make some more tame kimchi, just to give it a try.

CD
 

Yorky

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I've never actually had kimchi, so I don't know if I would like it, or not. I have heard before that kimchi varies a lot, depending on who makes it and how. I've heard that the kimchi that goes in a clay pot and gets buried in the ground can be "pungent." I'll eventually make some more tame kimchi, just to give it a try.

CD

*Well, you've hit the nail on the head there. My effort at kimchi was bloody awful. Assuming you mean what I call Khichdi Recipe - Food.com
 

The Late Night Gourmet

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Since my last post, I bought some kimchi at the local Asian supermarket. It was imported from Korea, so I assume it was pretty authentic.

I hated it. :thumbsdown:

CD

Yep...like I said above, the cooks were probably lazy. If you like pickled onions (which honestly are hard to mess up), you should like a properly-prepared kimchi.
 

TastyReuben

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Yep...like I said above, the cooks were probably lazy. If you like pickled onions (which honestly are hard to mess up), you should like a properly-prepared kimchi.
I don't know about that...I like pickled onions just fine, and my ex-SIL is Korean born-and-raised and a phenomenal cook, but her kimchi...no, thanks. Not to my taste. At all.
 

caseydog

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Yep...like I said above, the cooks were probably lazy. If you like pickled onions (which honestly are hard to mess up), you should like a properly-prepared kimchi.

The texture and crunch of the kimchi I bought was similar to pickled red onions, and there was a similar "tanginess," but there was some flavor in it that tasted kind of nasty to me.

If I were to make my own kimchi from a good recipe, I could probably figure out what the ingredient(s) are that bother me, and just leave them out. But, would it still be kimchi?

CD
 

The Late Night Gourmet

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If I were to make my own kimchi from a good recipe, I could probably figure out what the ingredient(s) are that bother me, and just leave them out. But, would it still be kimchi?

medtran49 and I have both posted recipes here that we like. And, as for that last sentence: as long as you're not on a cooking show and claiming that it's kimchi, no problem! Fancy pants chefs on cooking shows tend to nail the contestants for claiming that what they present is an authentic version of something.
 

medtran49

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medtran49 and I have both posted recipes here that we like. And, as for that last sentence: as long as you're not on a cooking show and claiming that it's kimchi, no problem! Fancy pants chefs on cooking shows tend to nail the contestants for claiming that what they present is an authentic version of something.
Heck, i made fusion cuban kimchi and cajun kimchi for a dumpling challenge on another forum. We really liked the Cajun kimchi and the cuban just needed a few tweaks. Made fusion potstickers with appropriate ingredients.
 

The Late Night Gourmet

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Heck, i made fusion cuban kimchi and cajun kimchi for a dumpling challenge on another forum. We really liked the Cajun kimchi and the cuban just needed a few tweaks. Made fusion potstickers with appropriate ingredients.

That’s part of the fun. There are many places where the lines cross with cuisines, and a handful that distinguish them. It’s why fusions work.
 
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