Recipe Chiles en Nogada (Stuffed Poblano Chiles with a Walnut Cream Sauce)

karadekoolaid

Legendary Member
Joined
4 Aug 2021
Local time
9:49 AM
Messages
6,269
Location
Caracas, Venezuela
Ingredients:
5-6 Poblano chiles
2 tbsps olive oil
1/2 onion, diced small
1 clove garlic, minced
150 gms minced beef
150 gms minced pork
1 tsp salt
1 tsp ground black pepper
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground cloves
1 tsp oregano
125 gms crushed tomatoes
50 mls sherry
1 small apple, diced
1/2 plantain, diced
50 gms raisins, roughly chopped
50 gms slivered almonds, roughly chopped
For the walnut cream sauce:
65 gms walnuts
115 gms goat cheese
65 mls sour cream
65 mls double cream
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
To garnish:
Fresh parsley, chopped
Pomegranate seeds

Method:
  • For the chiles:
  • Place the Poblano chiles directly on the burners on your stove - or put them under the grill (broiler). Burn the chiles until the skin turns black; turn over, and repeat until all the skin has blackened.
  • For the filling:
  • Remove from the heat. Put the chiles in a plastic bag and close it up. Leave for 15 minutes or so.
  • Remove the chiles from the bag. Rub or pull off the blackened skin.
  • Make an incision along the chile and remove the seeds from inside. Wash briefly to eliminate skin and seeds. Set aside.
  • In a large frying pan, heat the oil and add the onions. Sauté briefly, then add the garlic and mix well until softened.
  • Add the minced meat and cook over medium heat until the meat begins to brown.
  • Add the salt, pepper, cinnamon, cloves and oregano and stir for a minute.
  • Now add the tomatoes and the sherry, mix well and cook for 4-5 minutes.
  • Add the rest of the ingredients , mix well and cook for 5 - 10 minutes. Add a little water if necessary.
  • For the walnut cream sauce:
  • You need to peel the walnuts. Very tedious - soak the walnut halves in boiling water for about 20 minutes, then peel off the skin (or as much skin as you can peel off) with a small vegetable knife. Set the peeled walnuts aside on kitchen towels.
  • Place the walnuts, goat cheese, sour cream, double cream, salt and sugar in a blender, and blitz until smooth. If the sauce is too thick, add a little milk.
  • To serve:
  • Make a horizontal slice in the chiles and remove all the seeds.
  • Stuff the chiles with the meat mixture. Do not over stuff. Seal the chiles with toothpicks, put them in an ovenproof dish, cover with foil and place in a 285º oven for about 15-20 minutes, until just warmed through.
  • Put the walnut cream sauce in a deep dish and warm through in the microwave. Do this 30 seconds at a time; stir after each 30 seconds until the sauce is warm - it should not boil.
  • Place the poblano chiles on a plate and remove the toothpicks. Pour the sauce over the top, sprinkle with pomegranate seeds, and garnish with parsley.
    93090


    93091


    93099


    93097


    93095


    93096

 
Looks good:)
Interesting recipe, it almost seems like a bit of a fusion dish. I’m use to using Poblano’s with Latin dishes but the cream sauce, walnuts and Pomegranate seeds remind me of Armenian or Turkish dishes I’ve made.

Don’t forget to enter it into the monthly! :)
 
Interesting recipe, it almost seems like a bit of a fusion dish
It was invented in 1821 by the nuns in Puebla, south of Mexico City. It´s considered one of Mexico´s classic, iconic dishes. The chile poblano is, in fact, native to Puebla - but you´re right, in a sense; it is a fusion dish. Pomegranate, walnut and raisins are all Mediterranean. The Spanish colonized most of Central and South America, and brought their food with them: olives, raisins, capers, anchovies, pork, chorizo, and wine sherry and brandy. There are many South American recipes which incongruously use olives, capers and raisins, all the way down to Argentina.
 
It was invented in 1821 by the nuns in Puebla, south of Mexico City. It´s considered one of Mexico´s classic, iconic dishes. The chile poblano is, in fact, native to Puebla - but you´re right, in a sense; it is a fusion dish. Pomegranate, walnut and raisins are all Mediterranean. The Spanish colonized most of Central and South America, and brought their food with them: olives, raisins, capers, anchovies, pork, chorizo, and wine sherry and brandy. There are many South American recipes which incongruously use olives, capers and raisins, all the way down to Argentina.

I never thought of Mexico having walnut trees. They are not even native to Texas. That walnut cream sauce is something I never would have expected from Mexico.

I also wonder how Mexican chorizo evolved into what it is today???

CD
 
I never thought of Mexico having walnut trees.
They don´t (or at least, I think they don´t :laugh: ) and I´m sure this was just another Spanish import from la conquista.The Spanish brought olives, raisins, wine, pomegranates, walnuts, athlete´s foot, B.O. and diseases, and took away potatoes, tomatoes, beans, squash, chiles, chocolate, coffee and a whole bunch of gold and precious jewels. Not a bad exchange, eh?
 
Wow looks amazing thanks for sharing this recipe, you can make so many different versions of this, and I can't wait to try it!
 
I´ve just thought of another reason for the walnuts and olives. The recipe was created by nuns - and I´m pretty sure the Mayans and Aztecs didn´t have nuns. Another hangover from the colonization. I´d wager many of those nuns came from Sevilla, Madrid and Valladolid, rather than Taxco, Guadalajara and Tequesquitengo!!
 
Back
Top Bottom