Chilli with/without beans

flyinglentris

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I have not made Chilli in a month of Sundays it seems. Lately, I have only made it meatless, but always with Black Beans.

I can see the truth of having a Chilli with Meat only. That possibility only makes sense.

I will share what I really hate about some Chillis - ground Meat (ground Beef, Pork, Turkey, Chicken, whatever).

When I make Chilli with Meat, I do so using cubed Meats or in the case of Chicken or Turkey, large pieces.

My most preferred Chilli with Meat would include both Pork and Beef with the possible inclusion of Bacon.

Bacon can work out well in Chilli and for example, would go well with a Chicken Chilli.
 

caseydog

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I have not made Chilli in a month of Sundays it seems. Lately, I have only made it meatless, but always with Black Beans.

I can see the truth of having a Chilli with Meat only. That possibility only makes sense.

I will share what I really hate about some Chillis - ground Meat (ground Beef, Pork, Turkey, Chicken, whatever).

When I make Chilli with Meat, I do so using cubed Meats or in the case of Chicken or Turkey, large pieces.

My most preferred Chilli with Meat would include both Pork and Beef with the possible inclusion of Bacon.

Bacon can work out well in Chilli and for example, would go well with a Chicken Chilli.

Chili originated in South Texas, and is the official state food of Texas. The original versions used diced beef, not ground, and had no beans or tomato products -- just beef and chili peppers. It was originally considered a stew.

It has evolved, and as it spread across the US, and the rest of the world, it changed.

I use ground beef, but it is a very large grind, so it has a texture closer to diced meat. I also use a small amount of tomato sauce, and I use pinto beans. To some Texans, that is chili blasphemy. But, for the most part, Texans do what I do -- make it the way they like it.

Texas chili is generally served over rice, or cornbread.

CD
 

rascal

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Chili originated in South Texas, and is the official state food of Texas. The original versions used diced beef, not ground, and had no beans or tomato products -- just beef and chili peppers. It was originally considered a stew.

It has evolved, and as it spread across the US, and the rest of the world, it changed.

I use ground beef, but it is a very large grind, so it has a texture closer to diced meat. I also use a small amount of tomato sauce, and I use pinto beans. To some Texans, that is chili blasphemy. But, for the most part, Texans do what I do -- make it the way they like it.

Texas chili is generally served over rice, or cornbread.

CD

Could you post your recipe for chilly, I'd like to try it your way, we have everything here I think. Well pinto beans are a new one on me but pretty certain I can get them.

Russ
 

caseydog

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Could you post your recipe for chilly, I'd like to try it your way, we have everything here I think. Well pinto beans are a new one on me but pretty certain I can get them.

Russ

Well, I don't have a recipe. I just know how I like it. It is a very simple thing to make -- not a lot of ingredients, and not a lot of work. I will try to come up with something written. Also, if you can't get pinto beans, black beans will work just fine. You should be able to easily get everything else.

People who enter chili competitions often use fresh chili peppers, and dried chilis that they rehydrate. Most people here use a good chili powder, which has roughly the same blend of chili peppers, in a powdered form, in a bottle. That's what I generally do.

CD
 
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rascal

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Well, I don't have a recipe. I just know how I like it. It is a very simple thing to make -- not a lot of ingredients, and not a lot of work. I will try to come up with something written. Also, if you can't get pinto beans, black beans will work just fine. You should be able to easily get everything else.

People who enter chili competitions often use fresh chili peppers, and dried chilis that they rehydrate. Most people here use a good chili powder, which has roughly the same blend of chili peppers, in a powdered form, in a bottle. That's what I generally do.

CD
I have a can of black beans in my pantry my daughter got when she was living here. I will put pinto on my list though. I guess it's like nacho mix, I have my fave and never had anyone complain.
Look forward to your chilly. :)

Russ
 

flyinglentris

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I have a can of black beans in my pantry my daughter got when she was living here. I will put pinto on my list though. I guess it's like nacho mix, I have my fave and never had anyone complain.
Look forward to your chilly. :)

Russ

The basics of a standard Bean Chili are Beans, Onion, Tomato, Pepper, Chili Powder and Tomato Sauce or Puree.

Chilli has no standard recipe as it is an ad hoc DIY sort of thing.

Given the standard ingredients listed above you can go in a couple different directions, add Meat, make it hotter or milder, or exclude some things, like the Beans.

Boiling Beans will produce a Bean Broth which is conducive to a good Chilli.

I could never figure whether a Firehouse Chilli meant that it was created by the guys down at the local Fire Station or that it was an exceptionally hot spicy Chilli. To go hotter, use Habneros or some other really hot Peppers, to go milder, use Bells and toss in some Cinnamon.

I mentioned in an earlier post that Meats might include Beef, Pork, Chicken or Turkey. I don't like ground Meat in Chilli, but chunks. Similarly, it is preferable to me to have chunks of Tomato and Onion in big Strips, instead of diced to small bits.

Finally, Chilli can be thick as Stew or more liquid, like a Soup.

It's all down to preference. That's why Chilli has no standard recipe. You just do your own thing.
 

rascal

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The basics of a standard Bean Chili are Beans, Onion, Tomato, Pepper, Chili Powder and Tomato Sauce or Puree.

Chilli has no standard recipe as it is an ad hoc DIY sort of thing.

Given the standard ingredients listed above you can go in a couple different directions, add Meat, make it hotter or milder, or exclude some things, like the Beans.

Boiling Beans will produce a Bean Broth which is conducive to a good Chilli.

I could never figure whether a Firehouse Chilli meant that it was created by the guys down at the local Fire Station or that it was an exceptionally hot spicy Chilli. To go hotter, use Habneros or some other really hot Peppers, to go milder, use Bells and toss in some Cinnamon.

I mentioned in an earlier post that Meats might include Beef, Pork, Chicken or Turkey. I don't like ground Meat in Chilli, but chunks. Similarly, it is preferable to me to have chunks of Tomato and Onion in big Strips, instead of diced to small bits.

Finally, Chilli can be thick as Stew or more liquid, like a Soup.

It's all down to preference. That's why Chilli has no standard recipe. You just do your own thing.

Like nacho mix as I said earlier, personal preference . I've never made straight chilly as caseydog was describing.

Russ
 

caseydog

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Like nacho mix as I said earlier, personal preference . I've never made straight chilly as caseydog was describing.

Russ

Yes. There is the original "Texas Red," and there dozens of regional variations. To a foodie, I would say it is worth it to have a bowl of "Texas Red," at least once, if you are interested in Food history.

BTW, the original Nachos were created on the Mexican side of the Texas Mexico border, kind of by accident. They were just fried pieces of leftover corn tortillas, with cheese on them. Like Texas Chili, they evolved over the years, as they spread around the country, and the world.

CD
 

rascal

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Yes. There is the original "Texas Red," and there dozens of regional variations. To a foodie, I would say it is worth it to have a bowl of "Texas Red," at least once, if you are interested in Food history.

BTW, the original Nachos were created on the Mexican side of the Texas Mexico border, kind of by accident. They were just fried pieces of leftover corn tortillas, with cheese on them. Like Texas Chili, they evolved over the years, as they spread around the country, and the world.

CD

My grandkids love nachos. With lots sour cream.

Russ
 
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