Chilli with/without beans

flyinglentris

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I went ahead and made a Pearl Onion with Chicken and Bacon Chilli for the Alliums Recipe Challenge.

ChickenBaconPearlOnionChilli02.jpg


Chicken, Bacon and Pearl Onion Chilli Con Carne

While normally, Sweet or White Onion may be cut up and put in Chilli, whole Pearl Onions give the diner a sweet Onion flavor burst when spooned up and bit into. It's delicious.
 
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Dive Bar Casanova

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"Beans in Chili is like bread in meatloaf" Robert McCulloch, the guy who pretty much started chili cook offs and the maker of the chainsaw.
Most the cook-off contests here now don't allow beans at all. You may be able to add them 15 minutes after final judging.

I have the hand written recipe of the famous Chasens Chili by his lefty handwriting wife Maude. No secret now it's all over the internet. It has beans, but I kept the 3x5 with Maudes lefty handwriting with a Lindy pen. remember those?

Searching my file for it I can't find it. It's no doubt here someplace. It'll turn up, perhaps a cook-book marker.
I occasionally make it for pot lucks.

But I did find this treasure (stuck to the back of another card) I thought was long lost:
LA City Schools re-baked bread brownies:
 

caseydog

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"Beans in Chili is like bread in meatloaf" Robert McCulloch, the guy who pretty much started chili cook offs and the maker of the chainsaw.
Most the cook-off contests here now don't allow beans at all. You may be able to add them 15 minutes after final judging.

I have the hand written recipe of the famous Chasens Chili by his lefty handwriting wife Maude. No secret now it's all over the internet. It has beans, but I kept the 3x5 with Maudes lefty handwriting with a Lindy pen. remember those?

Searching my file for it I can't find it. It's no doubt here someplace. It'll turn up, perhaps a cook-book marker.
I occasionally make it for pot lucks.

But I did find this treasure (stuck to the back of another card) I thought was long lost:
LA City Schools re-baked bread brownies:

The big boy of the chili cookoffs is the Terlingua International Chili Championship.

Terlingua Championship Cookoff

CD
 

Dive Bar Casanova

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Wolf Brand chili, no beans. It's a Texas canned staple. I like to pour it onto a big baked potato, and top it with some shredded cheddar cheese. It is also the chili of choice for Frito Pie.

CD
An absolute must for Hot Dogs in the circle of picky eaters in this house. They make a Hot Dog Sauce too that is good. Use to be off the shelf at Walmart.
 

detroitdad

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I used to make it with a few different types of beans. About 4 years ago I acquired this fun affliction called Diverticulitis. Beans is one of the things that sends my intestines through the roof. I mean, even a tablespoon will destroy my next day. It really sucks. I digress. Now I make chili two ways. I make a 2 meat chili with out beans and a veggie chili with beans (for my wife)
 

JAS_OH1

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Chili originated in South Texas, and is the official state food of Texas. The original versions used diced beef, not ground, and had no beans or tomato products -- just beef and chili peppers. It was originally considered a stew. Texas chili is generally served over rice, or cornbread.

CD
My parents met and got married in SE Texas. That's how we had it, with rice AND cornbread. It was served over rice and the cornbread was on the side with plenty of butter.
 

JAS_OH1

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Yes. Usually Wolf Brand Chili, no beans from a can -- this is a quick midweek meal. I prefer grated cheddar cheese and finely diced onions as garnishment.

CD
When I make a pot of chili, we eat off it for a few days and then I portion it and freeze most of it in 2-4 serving containers (with labels and dates) that can be easily thawed for quick midweek meals. I can't abide canned food. I have it in my pantry in case of a zombie apocalypse (just kidding, really more like if something happens with the food supply chain for whatever reason).

I remember when I graduated from massage therapy school and got my first job at a spa with hairdressers, nail techs, estheticians, etc. People would tend to leave food in the break room refrigerator and the spa owner got sick and tired of it being clogged with possibly spoiled food. She put a note on a dry erase board on the refrigerator door that stated, "People, please date your food." Someone wrote on it underneath: "Why, what's wrong with men?" :laugh:
 

Dive Bar Casanova

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I used to make it with a few different types of beans. About 4 years ago I acquired this fun affliction called Diverticulitis. Beans is one of the things that sends my intestines through the roof. I mean, even a tablespoon will destroy my next day. It really sucks. I digress. Now I make chili two ways. I make a 2 meat chili with out beans and a veggie chili with beans (for my wife)
One of our kids suffers that. We have to be real careful with his intake.
 

Yorky

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My first venture into cooking chilli (con carne) was back in '84. I obtained the basic recipe from a fortnightly magazine publication called "Supercook" although I've adapted it somewhat since. Initially I would include kidney beans but found that my eight year old son would fish them out and leave them at the side of the plate so I started excluding them. I have excluded them ever since.

(Aside: My son was sent home from school one afternoon with a note to "please stop feeding him chilli" after a second accident in class).

I have always used minced (ground) beef, either mincing it myself from the rump, buying it pre-minced or asking the butcher to mince it for me.

I always use fresh chillis, roughly chopped and supplement them with cayenne pepper. Over the years I've used various types of fresh chillis; Thai hot, jalapeno (red or green), cayenne (red or green), or a combination. As the years have gone by, the number of chillis that I add has increased more that two fold as my taste buds have deteriorated with age (and cigarettes and booze).

I add either fresh tomatoes (peeled and chopped) or tinned tomatoes if good fresh tomatoes are not readily available. I add only a little tomato puree as I find it a little rich for my taste.

Onions I add in the proportion of roughly 2/3rds the weight of the beef and I add a lot of fresh garlic.

I virtually always serve chilli with a type of bread, be it baguette, naan, rotis or a crusty loaf. I am not averse to serving chilli with rice but I just don't.

 

caseydog

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My first venture into cooking chilli (con carne) was back in '84. I obtained the basic recipe from a fortnightly magazine publication called "Supercook" although I've adapted it somewhat since. Initially I would include kidney beans but found that my eight year old son would fish them out and leave them at the side of the plate so I started excluding them. I have excluded them ever since.

(Aside: My son was sent home from school one afternoon with a note to "please stop feeding him chilli" after a second accident in class).

I have always used minced (ground) beef, either mincing it myself from the rump, buying it pre-minced or asking the butcher to mince it for me.

I always use fresh chillis, roughly chopped and supplement them with cayenne pepper. Over the years I've used various types of fresh chillis; Thai hot, jalapeno (red or green), cayenne (red or green), or a combination. As the years have gone by, the number of chillis that I add has increased more that two fold as my taste buds have deteriorated with age (and cigarettes and booze).

I add either fresh tomatoes (peeled and chopped) or tinned tomatoes if good fresh tomatoes are not readily available. I add only a little tomato puree as I find it a little rich for my taste.

Onions I add in the proportion of roughly 2/3rds the weight of the beef and I add a lot of fresh garlic.

I virtually always serve chilli with a type of bread, be it baguette, naan, rotis or a crusty loaf. I am not averse to serving chilli with rice but I just don't.


You would not be expelled from Texas for that. :okay:

Try it with some fresh cornbread sometime.

CD
 

caseydog

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Cornbread is not something that's available here (AFAIK).

I had "chilli" in Houston early 90s. I couldn't taste it!

Not every place in Texas has good chili, just as not every place in England has good fish and chips. I'm guessing there is some bad Thai food in Thailand.

I suspect when you say, "I couldn't taste it," that you mean it wasn't "hot" enough. When I serve chili to guests, I go a little on the mild side, and put a variety of hot sauces on the table. Not everyone is looking to have their faces blown off. I aim for good flavor, and let the pepper-heads add as much heat as they want.

BTW, my previous comment about your chili was meant as a compliment.

CD
 
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