Ever had to cook dinner in someone else's kitchen?

TodayInTheKitchen

Active Member
Joined
30 Jan 2019
Messages
443
Location
Detroit, MI
Website
todayinthekitchen.com
Recently, I have been invited to several friends houses to cook them dinner. I have been "wowing" them with en papillote recipes I learned from CookingBites. However, I notice some differences in my cooking style when I am cooking in a foreign kitchen.

Any funny stories?

Like the time I had to make Taco Soup with all canned goods, onion powder, garlic powder, and no cumin powder. Not a fresh ingredient in the whole recipe. :headshake:
 
Last edited:

medtran49

Über Member
Joined
3 Dec 2017
Messages
2,635
Location
SE Florida
Not funny stories, but I learned that DD never uses a steel, much less sharpens her knives unless Craig does it for her. I've also learned to do as much cooking and prepping as I can at home because her kitchen is not well equipped. As I've noted before, she's not real big on cooking.

I've also learned when staying with elderly relatives not to assume that something in their pantry or even fridge is still edible. When my step mom was in a bad car accident and I had to go live in Mississippi for about 3 months to take care of my dad (dementia) while she was in hospital and rehab, I quickly found that a large portion of her pantry and even things in fridge like condiments were out of date, and I'm talking years, even 13 for one item. Since I had to pay bills too while she was unable, I found out they had been eating out a lot as they had a running tab at the 2 restaurants in their little town. Found out she would still cook or buy items for breakfast, but they nearly always were eating out otherwise. I knew when I had visited over the last few years that we ate out a lot but just figured she didn't want to cook for me because she only cooked country type food, which was totally fine with me, but found out I was wrong, she had just gotten to the point she really didn't want to cook because she was usually too tired later in the day.

Before my dad remarried, I would always cook for him once I was old enough to travel by myself when I visited because he didn't cook. He'd heat up something frozen or canned, but that's about it. He'd eat out pretty much, though would get a home cooked meal at friend's homes or from a lady friend sometimes. I got to learn how to use and cook on a gas stove, and we're talking 35-40 years ago, boy was that fun. He had bare minimum cooking equipment. We had to buy a few things before I even had the basic essentials to cook his favorite meals the first time I visited.
 

rascal

Über Member
Joined
18 Mar 2018
Messages
4,629
Location
Christchurch New Zealand
We hire houses out for 2 weeks at Xmas for all our family. Normally around 10 people. Usually 4 or 5 bedroom homes or a big lodge. As every house is different the cooking oven etc I don't have any problem. I know the temp and cooking times so no problem for me. I've even used gas to cook, not something we normally have here. Again no problem. I always take my good ingredients with me as well. Like my tandoori mix and my Garam masala. And other spices that are not common.

Russ
 

rascal

Über Member
Joined
18 Mar 2018
Messages
4,629
Location
Christchurch New Zealand
Not funny stories, but I learned that DD never uses a steel, much less sharpens her knives unless Craig does it for her. I've also learned to do as much cooking and prepping as I can at home because her kitchen is not well equipped. As I've noted before, she's not real big on cooking.

I've also learned when staying with elderly relatives not to assume that something in their pantry or even fridge is still edible. When my step mom was in a bad car accident and I had to go live in Mississippi for about 3 months to take care of my dad (dementia) while she was in hospital and rehab, I quickly found that a large portion of her pantry and even things in fridge like condiments were out of date, and I'm talking years, even 13 for one item. Since I had to pay bills too while she was unable, I found out they had been eating out a lot as they had a running tab at the 2 restaurants in their little town. Found out she would still cook or buy items for breakfast, but they nearly always were eating out otherwise. I knew when I had visited over the last few years that we ate out a lot but just figured she didn't want to cook for me because she only cooked country type food, which was totally fine with me, but found out I was wrong, she had just gotten to the point she really didn't want to cook because she was usually too tired later in the day.

Before my dad remarried, I would always cook for him once I was old enough to travel by myself when I visited because he didn't cook. He'd heat up something frozen or canned, but that's about it. He'd eat out pretty much, though would get a home cooked meal at friend's homes or from a lady friend sometimes. I got to learn how to use and cook on a gas stove, and we're talking 35-40 years ago, boy was that fun. He had bare minimum cooking equipment. We had to buy a few things before I even had the basic essentials to cook his favorite meals the first time I visited.
I know what you are saying about due by date, my wife is a shocker, cream cheese, sour cream, stuff like that, months past use by. And like you found, some pesto years past due date. Every now and then I check everything out and bin about 4 or 5 things.

Russ
 

Karen W

Senior Member
Joined
30 Jul 2018
Messages
1,260
Location
.
I cooked in a friend's Timeshare twice. Remember those? One was Thanksgiving in Palm Springs (the desert). I brought my huge roasting pan, and half my kitchen, not knowing what kitchen tools etc would be there. Good thing. There was practically nothing there kitchen-wise. I'm also accustomed to reaching for things in the same place. It felt odd.

The other timeshare was at a ski resort in Big Bear. The altitude was high, and nothing turned out right. Felt stoned and lightheaded the whole time I was there. Mostly, I spaced out with a cocktail, and listened to the icicles melt.
 
Last edited:

TodayInTheKitchen

Active Member
Joined
30 Jan 2019
Messages
443
Location
Detroit, MI
Website
todayinthekitchen.com
The other timeshare was at a ski resort in Big Bear. The altitude was high, and nothing turned out right. Felt stoned and lightheaded the whole time I was there. Mostly, I spaced out with a cocktail, and listened to the icicles melt.
The whole altitude and cooking is something I never thought of. Very interesting.
Also, "stoned and lightheaded" could be a good thing in some kitchens. :laugh:
 

rascal

Über Member
Joined
18 Mar 2018
Messages
4,629
Location
Christchurch New Zealand
We went to a friend's house in Kuala Lumpur to cook two dishes for a party. One was chilli con carne and the other was tom yam khung. He explained that he didn't have any cooking utensils and could we bring our own. He didn't even have salt and pepper!
That would do my head in, big time, not even s and p. Man...

Russ
 

TodayInTheKitchen

Active Member
Joined
30 Jan 2019
Messages
443
Location
Detroit, MI
Website
todayinthekitchen.com
I've done it many times, but over time, people tend to start getting bossy, trying to come into the kitchen & alter the way that I'm doing things!! I get mad & walk out of the kitchen & say; You do it!! I'm done!!

When they start paying me to cook THEIR way, then I'll do it for them!! :mad::headshake:
Interesting point @Shermie. I have not done the "Other people's kitchen" enough to ever face that situation. Usually, they just leave me alone. I am not sure how I might react. :scratchhead:
 

Shermie

Veteran
Joined
21 Aug 2014
Messages
4,475
Location
Brighton, MA.
That is pure boldness & balls the size of an elephant to do that!! If they are going to do that, then I want no part of it!! It's ridiculous to ask me to cook something and then boss me around because I don't cook THEIR way!!! :mad::headshake:
 

rascal

Über Member
Joined
18 Mar 2018
Messages
4,629
Location
Christchurch New Zealand
That is pure boldness & balls the size of an elephant to do that!! If they are going to do that, then I want no part of it!! It's ridiculous to ask me to cook something and then boss me around because I don't cook THEIR way!!! :mad::headshake:
Lol, it's all in good fun. She is a very good cook, I'm learning how to cook Japanese watching her, at a distance,lol.

Russ
 

Elawin

Veteran
Joined
1 Apr 2016
Messages
3,485
Location
London/Essex border, UK
I'm OK cooking in a strange kitchen when I'm on holiday, but not when cooking for guests. I go to pieces.

I had a new boyfriend about 50 years ago and had only been going out for a few days when he asked me round to his place for dinner. He was also inviting some friends over. I agreed to go but it was only when I got there that I realised that I was meant to cook the meal! Not only was it a strange kitchen, but he had an electric cooker and I had never used one in my life before. Fifty years ago electric cookers were definitely not so user-friendly as they are now. I was mortified!

I managed to cook roast chicken with all the trimmings, but it was more luck than judgement and not everything was ready at the same time.

I've only ever done that once since, and panic set in again.

When I go to my daughter's house I can't even make myself a cup of coffee let alone work out how to turn her super-duper oven, hob, and microwave on, or know which cupboard front hides her dishwasher. The fridge/freezer is easy to find because it's one of those huge American-style ones, but I'm forever opening the wrong side of it.
 

rascal

Über Member
Joined
18 Mar 2018
Messages
4,629
Location
Christchurch New Zealand
I'm OK cooking in a strange kitchen when I'm on holiday, but not when cooking for guests. I go to pieces.

I had a new boyfriend about 50 years ago and had only been going out for a few days when he asked me round to his place for dinner. He was also inviting some friends over. I agreed to go but it was only when I got there that I realised that I was meant to cook the meal! Not only was it a strange kitchen, but he had an electric cooker and I had never used one in my life before. Fifty years ago electric cookers were definitely not so user-friendly as they are now. I was mortified!

I managed to cook roast chicken with all the trimmings, but it was more luck than judgement and not everything was ready at the same time.

I've only ever done that once since, and panic set in again.

When I go to my daughter's house I can't even make myself a cup of coffee let alone work out how to turn her super-duper oven, hob, and microwave on, or know which cupboard front hides her dishwasher. The fridge/freezer is easy to find because it's one of those huge American-style ones, but I'm forever opening the wrong side of it.
Lol, I too have s big Canadian (maytag) kids always get the doors wrong,lol

Russ
 
Top Bottom