Homemade crème fraîche?

TastyReuben

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btw, Federal law prohibits interstate sale of raw milk - within the state, state laws apply - which are inconsistent.
Ohio - you're out of luck - it is prohibited except if you own a cow and board the cow on a farm - then you can have your own milk....
Raw Milk Laws State-by-State - Milk - ProCon.org
Yep, it's a commonly-occurring issue here, because of our large Amish population. They're occasionally caught trying to sell raw milk on the sly.
 

medtran49

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In Florida, you can't sell unpasteurized milk for human consumption, but you can for animal consumption. We've bought it that way on occasion to make cheese.
 

caseydog

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Watched a doco the other day about the Amish guy that was nuts, killed and gutted his wife. Amish knew he was nuts so they sent him to a physio. Wtf?
He ended up taking his own life.

Russ
Not being allowed to drive a car would drive me nuts, too. :hyper:

CD

CD
 

Morning Glory

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Wow! The experiment has really worked. It tastes gorgeous and has thickened considerably. I haven't tasted full fat crème fraîche in an age so its difficult to know how it compares but its certainly delicious. I think it works out a bit cheaper than buying ready made. I used 150 ml of Morrisons double cream (£1.10 for 300ml) and 1tbsp of Yeo Valley Kefir (£1 for 350ml).

Photo to follow
 

Hemulen

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^ It is laudable that you are making your own crème fraîche! I found a Russian recipe online in which the ratio of double cream and kefir or (thicker) 'smetana' is 4:1. The mixture is kept in room temperature for 24 hours until it develops a 'skin', after which it is refridgerated.

We're lucky in terms of dairy products in Finland so I've never tried making my own sour cream products. Despite the pandemic, there are a zillion brands of pasteurized kefir (piimä; which is sold even 0% fat), crème fraîche, sour cream (smetana), cooking yoghourt and 'viili' ('prostokvasha', processed sour whole milk; a Nordic kind of sour milk, a bit similar to youghourt but less sour) available in every corner store. 'Viili' is really good and fresh. It has a thin layer of condensed 'sour cream velvet' on top. The rest is light, slightly elastic and mild to taste. It is a wonderful summer snack with e.g. muesli (granola), jam or sugar & cinnamon.

viili.jpg

Image: pinterest.com
 
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Morning Glory

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I've heard of Kefir but never tried it - it seems to be a fermented yoghurt or milk?
All I can say is that since I discovered it I've stopped buying yoghurt. Its delicious and more complex tasting.

I found a Russian recipe online in which the ratio of double cream and kefir or (thicker) 'smetana' is 4:1. The mixture is kept in room temperature for 24 hours until it develops a 'skin', after which it is refridgerated.
Maybe I should have used more kefir. The result is quite thick but could be thicker.
 
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