Italian cooking guide

morning glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Local time
6:27 PM
Messages
33,206
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
What are the basic skills vital to learn for Italian cooking? What basic thing should every inspiring cook be able to do well??
I'm going to split off your questions: I'll leave the first part in this thread for anyone who knows about Italian cooking to answer. The second part I'll move into a new thread as its more general, and a good new topic. Done: see here: What are the basic skills that aspiring cooks should learn?
 
Last edited:

morning glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Local time
6:27 PM
Messages
33,206
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
Re Italian cooking, I'm no particular expert but making home-made pasta might be a good start. There is a shortage of dried pasta at the time of writing so this could be a useful thing to know how to do, in any case. At its simplest, pasta is plain flour and water, mixed to a dough, kneaded a bit and rolled into a thin sheet. Many recipes add egg, but this isn't strictly necessary.

Unfortunately, flour is now getting hard to come by too, right now!

In my experience, quantities needed are approx: 250g flour and 130ml water for 2 portions.
 

Saranak

Active Member
Joined
7 Mar 2020
Local time
6:27 PM
Messages
510
Location
Birmingham UK
Thanks for that Saranak -although you might regret the offer after I bombarded you with questions!!!!

What are the basic skills vital to learn for Italian cooking? What basic thing should every inspiring cook be able to do well??
Prego,
Please excuse how I write.
Italian food not difficult, many famous dish start from peasants. Start with best ingredient you can. First understand how make good tomato sauce, this is base for many dish. Learn how make fresh pasta and make own dough for pizza base an calzone. Most important is there no hard rule, I post recipe for Napulitano Ragu on here my family way different to family in next house! Also learn how make passata to do this you need mouli. Try be authentic, San Marzano tomato, Porcini, Tropea onion, use tradizionale or DOC balsamico, fresh herbs when can an good olive oil. I use little spices except red chillies when make Arrabiata sauce.
Learn how make Soffrito base for most Ragu soup or stew, this onion carrot celery chopped small. Never put wine in food you not drink!
I post some recipes on here have look and try. If you stuck ask. Understand heat when you fry burn garlic is bitter.
As MG say I from Napoli I make Napulitano food each region in Italia has own ways and specials. Some dishes that MypinchofItaly make will be not same as I make and other way. Tradition in Lombardy and Campania have differences as all region. I only put white wine inside when I make Ragu.

Sarana x
 
Last edited by a moderator:

CraigC

Veteran
Recipe Challenge Judge
Joined
1 Dec 2017
Local time
1:27 PM
Messages
3,107
Location
SE Florida
Prego,
Please excuse how I write.
Italian food not difficult, many famous dish start from peasants. Start with best ingredient you can. First understand how make good tomato sauce, this is base for many dish. Learn how make fresh pasta and make own dough for pizza base an calzone. Most important is there no hard rule, I post recipe for Napulitano Ragu on here my family way different to family in next house! Also learn how make passata to do this you need mouli. Try be authentic, San Marzano tomato, Porcini, Tropea onion, use tradizionale or DOC balsamico, fresh herbs when can an good olive oil. I use little spices except red chillies when make Arrabiata sauce.
Learn how make Soffrito base for most Ragu soup or stew, this onion carrot celery chopped small. Never put wine in food you not drink!
I post some recipes on here have look and try. If you stuck ask. Understand heat when you fry burn garlic is bitter.
As MG say I from Napoli I make Napulitano food each region in Italia has own ways and specials. Some dishes that MypinchofItaly make will be not same as I make and other way. Tradition in Lombardy and Campania have differences as all region. I only put white wine inside when I make Ragu.

Sarana x
Sofritos are used in many cultural cuisines, especially Latin. We make a lot of Cuban food and sofrito is a base for many dishes. This is like roux for many Cajun dishes, which also use the "Holy Trinity" of onions, green bell peppers and celery.
 

Saranak

Active Member
Joined
7 Mar 2020
Local time
6:27 PM
Messages
510
Location
Birmingham UK
Ciao Popeye,
I be honest I not like machine for pasta texture always seem strange for me. I use rolling pin over metre long I roll on large marble slab. Rolling pin belong to my Nonna. I close to 60 so give idea how old is. I think can get similar and lot less than machine.

Sarana x
 

morning glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Local time
6:27 PM
Messages
33,206
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
Ciao Popeye,
I be honest I not like machine for pasta texture always seem strange for me. I use rolling pin over metre long I roll on large marble slab. Rolling pin belong to my Nonna. I close to 60 so give idea how old is. I think can get similar and lot less than machine.

Sarana x
I've used both methods. I'm not sure if the texture is better for me either way, but then I'm not an experienced pasta maker! One thing I do know is that unless you have the right kind of work-top the pasta machine will not clamp on.

I have that issue in my kitchen and can only clamp on the pasta machine by opening a cupboard door - which is really rather annoying. Also, I often think twice about getting the machine out (like any machine that is not kept on the work-top). Sometimes its much simpler to make pasta by hand, particularly if its not a large amount.
 

Saranak

Active Member
Joined
7 Mar 2020
Local time
6:27 PM
Messages
510
Location
Birmingham UK
I've used both methods. I'm not sure if the texture is better for me either way, but then I'm not an experienced pasta maker! One thing I do know is that unless you have the right kind of work-top the pasta machine will not clamp on.

I have that issue in my kitchen and can only clamp on the pasta machine by opening a cupboard door - which is really rather annoying. Also, I often think twice about getting the machine out (like any machine that is not kept on the work-top). Sometimes its much simpler to make pasta by hand, particularly if its not a large amount.
Is because I make lot at one time, I fold sheets for Lasagne, Ravioli and Tortellini and put in fridge. I roll an cut Tagliatelle, Pappardelle etc then hang on rack to dry. Friend buy me machine as present years ago I never used. I old fashion just way I taught.

Sarana x
 
Top Bottom