I've never cooked it... but I'd like to!

morning glory

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Soup dumplings, the way they make them down in NYC. The dumpling itself will be the hardest part to get right.
I am not sure what type of dumplings the are, being a Brit!

Octopus balls / Takoyaki, a Japanese street food. I've actually bought the pan for this, I just gotta get the nerve up to do it.
I've not heard of these but they sound delicious. A special pan?

Okay, a third: Tiramisu.
That isn't too difficult really. I haven't made one in ages as we don't eat sweet food very often.
 

medtran49

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Soup dumplings have a gelled filling that melts when they are cooked and turns into soup. Dim sum. I made them once from scratch. Used pig's feet, skin and bones for the broth.

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They are something I would rather get in a restaurant from now on. It wasn't so much the time it took, it's a 2 dayer at least making the filling, but the folding of the dumplings. I have picked right up on all the other dumpling fold techniques, but had a terrible time with these. I think it took me almost 2 hours to fold enough for dinner for the 2 of us, whereas I can do close to 50 in about 30 minutes of the other shapes.

They tasted great, but weren't so pretty.
 
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medtran49

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Tiramisu is really easy, especially if you use purchased ladyfingers, just some whipping, mixing the coffee and whatever booze you are using, putting it together, then grating chocolate or dusting with cocoa powder, then letting it sit for at least 8 hours, preferablyovernight. Worst part about it is buying the mascarpone, $$.
 

Mountain Cat

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Soup dumplings have a gelled filling that melts when they are cooked and turns into soup. Dim sum. I made them once from scratch. Used pig's feet, skin and bones for the broth.


They are something I would rather get in a restaurant from now on. It wasn't so much the time it took, it's a 2 dayer at least making the filling, but the folding of the dumplings. I have picked right up on all the other dumpling fold techniques, but had a terrible time with these. I think it took me almost 2 hours to fold enough for dinner for the 2 of us, whereas I can do close to 50 in about 30 minutes of the other shapes.

They tasted great, but weren't so pretty.
They're very good but it's a long haul to get down there now to NYC to eat them! I tried them once in a Connecticut restaurant, but they weren't quite up to the Chinatown standards.

I also do want to make the other sorts of Chinese dumplings, I should probably learn those before soup dumpling dumplings! I can already do the bone broth part - I'm actually making lamb/beef bone broth / soup base as I type. Not for dumplings, but just to have in general.
 

Mountain Cat

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Tiramisu is really easy, especially if you use purchased ladyfingers, just some whipping, mixing the coffee and whatever booze you are using, putting it together, then grating chocolate or dusting with cocoa powder, then letting it sit for at least 8 hours, preferablyovernight. Worst part about it is buying the mascarpone, $$.
Good to know! I'd probably try to make the lady fingers at some point. But maybe I'll make this for a party I'm having in a couple weeks (since I'll be busy, I will buy the lady fingers...)
 

Mountain Cat

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I've not heard of these but they sound delicious. A special pan?
.
Takoyaki needs a pan that holds 25 or 40 donut hole shaped and sized spots. You use it like a skillet. Some are even electric, others are less expensive (I got that) and you use it over your range. You pour in the takoyaki mixture, which is a dough, add in chopped octopus along with scallions, and use chopsticks to turn the dough rapidly in each slot, while the dough cooks.

There are a couple of sauces you top this with, and scatter on some more scallion and or bonito (shaved fish) flakes. Very good!!

If you don't like octopus, you can use shrimp, or just veggies.

I got a 24 spot pan, manual for cooktop. I figure I won't, for one, have the hand-eye coordination to do more than 24 at a time! (IF that)
 

medtran49

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I wonder if the holes are the same size as an aebleskiver pan?

ETA, nope, the aebleskiver holes are a bit bigger.
 
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morning glory

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Soup dumplings have a gelled filling that melts when they are cooked and turns into soup. Dim sum. I made them once from scratch. Used pig's feet, skin and bones for the broth.

37240-albums1042-picture6665.jpg


37240-albums1041-picture6666.jpg


They are something I would rather get in a restaurant from now on. It wasn't so much the time it took, it's a 2 dayer at least making the filling, but the folding of the dumplings. I have picked right up on all the other dumpling fold techniques, but had a terrible time with these. I think it took me almost 2 hours to fold enough for dinner for the 2 of us, whereas I can do close to 50 in about 30 minutes of the other shapes.

They tasted great, but weren't so pretty.
Ah - I remember now - they are Dim Sum and I did make them when we had the Cookalong. I agree re the folding!
 

morning glory

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Takoyaki needs a pan that holds 25 or 40 donut hole shaped and sized spots. You use it like a skillet. Some are even electric, others are less expensive (I got that) and you use it over your range. You pour in the takoyaki mixture, which is a dough, add in chopped octopus along with scallions, and use chopsticks to turn the dough rapidly in each slot, while the dough cooks.

There are a couple of sauces you top this with, and scatter on some more scallion and or bonito (shaved fish) flakes. Very good!!

If you don't like octopus, you can use shrimp, or just veggies.

I got a 24 spot pan, manual for cooktop. I figure I won't, for one, have the hand-eye coordination to do more than 24 at a time! (IF that)
This is fascinating. Having looked up some recipes I see that a special Takoyaki flour can be used.
 
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Clamshell

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I came across this rather interesting Malagasy recipe, a simple prawn dish with coconut milk. It's been on my mind for quite some time now and I hope to finally make it at home, maybe with chicken!
 

CraigC

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You should be on Masterchef, great presentation and I would love to try that.

Russ
The problem with those shows, they want you to cook what they want and not necessarily what you want!
 

morning glory

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The problem with those shows, they want you to cook what they want and not necessarily what you want!
The UK Masterchef features the entrants cooking their own dishes in most of the episodes - but they are also required to cook up challenges (such as the invention test).
 
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