Recipe Mashed Potato Soufflé (Mont Pommes D'or)

TastyReuben

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Mashed Potato Soufflé (Mont Pommes D'or)
Makes 4-6 servings

Ingredients
4 cups prepared mashed potatoes (leftovers preferred)
3 eggs
1/2 cup shredded cheese of choice (cheddar, gruyere, etc)
1 TB grated parmesan cheese
1 tsp oil or butter for dish
Salt & pepper to taste, if needed

Directions
Heat oven to 400F and prepare a broiler-safe gratin dish with oil or butter.
Place potatoes in mixing bowl and add eggs. Break up eggs and mix thoroughly with potatoes, then fold in shredded cheese.
Taste for seasoning and adjust, if necessary.
Pour potatoes into prepared dish and sprinkle with grated parmesan cheese
Bake at 400F for 35-40 min. Brown for a couple of minutes under broiler if the top hasn't browned to your liking.

Recipe courtesy of Jacques Pepin/KQED.org


 

Morning Glory

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A lovely simple recipe. Anything with potatoes in it pleases me!

However (apologies to Jaques Pepin if required) I wouldn't describe this as a soufflé. A soufflé, as I understand the term, is a light airy concoction which is prone to deflate unless served immediately.
 

Morning Glory

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That's exactly what this did.

I imagine it would (much as a quiche custard puffs up and then deflates) but the technique doesn't suggest soufflé. A soufflé normally uses whipped egg whites to achieve the lightness. The texture even when deflated would be light. This looks denser. I'm sure it tastes great whatever...
 

TastyReuben

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I imagine it would (much as a quiche custard puffs up and then deflates) but the technique doesn't suggest soufflé. A soufflé normally uses whipped egg whites to achieve the lightness. The texture even when deflated would be light. This looks denser. I'm sure it tastes great whatever...
It wasn't dense at all, extremely light. That's what we both like about it over a fried mashed potato cake - this has lots of little air bubbles in it, a little like honeycomb candy.

He talks about the whole egg versus whipped egg whites issue in an interview I read (or saw) and relates how his mom made soufflés in the family restaurant without separating the eggs. I think he said that separating the whites out and whipping those will yield a better rise, but only slightly better.

He also makes a cheese soufflé the same way. I've made both and done them in ramekins instead of a bigger baking dish, and I can attest that they rise beautifully and are wonderful airy.
 
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