Recipe Raw Onion Bread

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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Raw Onion Bread
rawonionbread.jpg


Ingredients

1-1.5kg large onions (you can use red, white or yellow onions)
1 cup ground sunflower seeds (grind in a coffee grinder)
1 cup ground flax/linseed seeds (grind in coffee grinder)
1/4-1/2 cup raw agave nectar (or any other sweet syrup, more if the onions are not sweet onions)
1/3 cup olive oil
3 tablespoons of raw tamari (soy sauce)

Method
  1. Peel onions, place in food processor and process in the food processor. I like to make sure that some are almost pureed and some are still at the chopped stage.
  2. Add the onions to a large bowl and stir in the wet ingredients
  3. Now add in the dry ingredients and mix well.
  4. You want a thickish paste, that you can spread onto the teflex sheets on the dehydrator trays. I have found our preferred thickness for this recipe makes just over 2 trays. Use a palette knife to spread the mix flat and take your time, it does eventually form a nice thinish layer (I usually aim for around 3-4mm thickness of wet mix.)
  5. Dehydrate for 1 hour at 120 degrees, then reduce to 105 degrees and dry for another 6-10 hours.
  6. Part way through drying, you will need to turn the over and remove the teflex sheets and continue drying them. How dry you want them or how chewy you want them is entirely up to you. We prefer them more crackerey than chewy...
  7. Cut up once dry - we usually aim for 9 large crackers per dehydrator sheet and store in an air tight container. They store surprisingly well, keeping for several weeks if they haven't been eaten!
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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It is very tasty. You just have different priorities when you eat RAW and also these are flatbreads which are crisp or slightly chewy in texture. Much more flavour and far far better for you than the crap that goes into modern sliced breads. Read the ingredients list of sliced white bread and see how many ingredients you don't actually need a PhD in Chemistry for (which incidentally I do have). I now make all my own bread and these Onion Breads disappear far faster than any pre-sliced loaf. Only my homemade sourdough disappears faster.
 

Morning Glory

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It is very tasty. You just have different priorities when you eat RAW and also these are flatbreads which are crisp or slightly chewy in texture. Much more flavour and far far better for you than the crap that goes into modern sliced breads. Read the ingredients list of sliced white bread and see how many ingredients you don't actually need a PhD in Chemistry for (which incidentally I do have). I now make all my own bread and these Onion Breads disappear far faster than any pre-sliced loaf. Only my homemade sourdough disappears faster.
I haven't got a dehydrator or I would try these. But I'm curious about how and when you eat them. As a snack on their own? With dips? With cheese II know you don't eat dairy cheese but I can imagine they would go with a good smelly cheese!).
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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You use them the same way as you would an single piece of sliced bread to create an open sandwich. Any filling/topping you want really. A raw diet foodie would not eat cheese or meat, it is actually more restrictive than a vegan diet because basically it is the same content as vegan (though raw honey is allowed) but no cooking involved. Even oil needs to be cold pressed, anything else has had heat used to extract extra oil from it and considered not raw. The same applies to honey, nuts (cashews in particular are heated to get them out of their shells more easily and cheaply) and various other food items (I have a brother-in-law who manages his type 1 diabetes through a raw food diet - it has been a revelation).

You can use an oven if your oven goes down really low. Some ovens don't go low enough though, it just depends on the make and model. Assuming that you are not specifically after a RAW version of these - for a raw food diet - then you can easily make them at around 100C but any higher will kill them. You will just need to watch them very carefully and probably prop the oven door ajar very slightly to prevent them from cooking. The aim is simply to remove the water content from everything, rather than cook them.

When I make them, I usually make a double batch, so that all 5 shelves of my 5 tray dehydrator are in use.
 
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