Salads

flyinglentris

Disabled and Retired Veteran
Joined
18 Dec 2017
Local time
7:47 PM
Messages
2,659
Location
USA
Wow, then it is fairly simple. Should I add Red Paprika peppers? They do come as green too, I believe.

I browsed through the pepper varieties, but got confused, Pirira and other mexican sorts...was unsure if they are hot or not.

Red Paprika Peppers are always sweet, as I mentioned earlier.

Thanks!

Paprika peppers may be yellow, not green.

If you need to know how hot a pepper is, find a listing that includes their Scoville Heat Units (SHU). Bell peppers show on the Scoville scale with a value of 0. The hottest pepper is nearly 3,000,000 SHU - and yes, that is hot. That pepper is also the most expensive and is called pepper X. Ghost peppers are cheaper and for those who never heard of pepper X, are considered the hottest at over 1,000,000 SHU.
 

flyinglentris

Disabled and Retired Veteran
Joined
18 Dec 2017
Local time
7:47 PM
Messages
2,659
Location
USA
Oh ...have never seen a yellow pointed paprika🤔...
SHU is a cool tip, thanks!
I can't go anywhere near the X...not even a jalapeno...😁

Just for fun, paprika pepper SHU ranges from 250 to 1000. Jalapeno SHU ranges from 2500 to 8000. Serrano pepper SHU ranges from 5000 to 15000. I love to use Serranos and prefer them to Jalapenos. :okay:

If you need to know the SHU of a pepper, just google 'peppername SHU'.
 

Morning Glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Recipe Challenge Judge
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Local time
3:47 AM
Messages
39,348
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
In the US, Romano peppers are smaller thin green peppers that have a good bite to them.

The red peppers in the photo look like Pirira chili peppers or Nagas. They also appear similar to Fresno peppers or Aleppos which are from the Mediterranean regions.

But in truth, paprika peppers look like the peppers in the photo too, and that's what Timenspace said they were - and we should have no reason to doubt that. They are paprika peppers.

There are a lot of different types of peppers and many of them look like some other type.
Romano or sweet long peppers are nothing like nagas which are super hot, small red chillies. In fact they are one of the hottest chillies available. I couldn't find any reference to Pirira on the internet - do you mean piri piri? Again, these are small thin hot red chillies.

Romano peppers are sweet and large. In fact they taste a bit similar to what is known in the US as red bell pepper. They're native to the mediterranean. In the US they are also known as Romano or Ramira as far as I can see (I've managed to find some US recipes which use them). However, the nearest indigenous American pepper seems to be the Anaheim.

Romano:
1617709808304.png

Anaheim:
1617709731143.png


This info from: Specialty Produce is San Diego's Best Wholesale Distributor (which is a USA site)
Red Romano chile peppers, botanically classified as Capsicum annuum, are an elongated, sweet variety that belongs to the Solanaceae or nightshade family. Found throughout the Mediterranean, Red Romano chile peppers are also known as Ramiro peppers and Sweet Pointed peppers, and the variety is widely used in both fresh and cooked applications, especially for roasting and stuffing. Red Romano chile peppers are highly favored for their sweet flavor and are often used as a more flavorful substitute for bell peppers.

Red Anaheim chile peppers are medium-sized, elongated and curved pods, averaging 15 to 25 centimeters in length, and have a conical shape with slight tapering towards the non-stem end. The semi-thick skin is smooth, waxy, and bright red with deep linear indentations running the length of the pod. Underneath the skin, the striated flesh ranges in color from orange-red to yellow and is crisp and aqueous, encasing a central cavity filled with ivory membranes and many round, cream-colored seeds. Red Anaheim chile peppers are the mature, ripe versions of the pepper and have a bright, slightly fruity, sweet, and peppery taste with a moderate to hot level of spice.

Mod.comment:
Please note this is a UK based forum so if you do want to translate the names of produce (especially in titles of recipes) they should be in UK English not necessarily American English. But really, there is no particular need to 'translate'. Many recipes here are posted by Americans using American English and we don't expect them to be 'translated' to UK English or vice versa. It would drive us all mad if we tried to add the English and American English versions of every ingredient!
 

TastyReuben

Nosh 'n' Splosh
Joined
15 Jul 2019
Local time
10:47 PM
Messages
10,705
Location
Ohio, US
Here's a typical salad at our house:
60700



That's romaine lettuce, carrot, celery, cucumber, radish, tomato, green olives, banana peppers (mine only), sweet pickles, and cheese, with homemade creamy buttermilk dressing:
60701

Haha-I forgot to list the egg. Not like it's really obvious or anything...
 
Last edited:

flyinglentris

Disabled and Retired Veteran
Joined
18 Dec 2017
Local time
7:47 PM
Messages
2,659
Location
USA
Egg salads, tuna salads and seafood salads are sandwich salads.

full.jpg

Egg salad sandwiches

full.jpg

Tuna Salad Sandwiches

full.jpg

Seafood Salad Sandwich
 

Morning Glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Recipe Challenge Judge
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Local time
3:47 AM
Messages
39,348
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
How about fruit in savoury salads? Chicken with charred lettuce, charred orange. I cooked the chicken in orange and juniper so the little black berries are juniper. The dressing was achiote oil and orange juice.

60750
 
Top Bottom