Recipe Steak and Kidney Pie With a Blue Cheese Crust

murphyscreek

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40368


Ingredients for Filling

800g chuck steak and kidney (50/50 cut in to large pieces)
1 large brown onion (chopped)
1 large carrot (chopped)
2 stalks of rosemary, leaves stripped off and chopped
6-7 sprigs thyme (tied in to a bundle with one of the sprigs)
2 cups beef stock
2 tbsp tomato paste
2 tbsp worcestireshire sauce
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
4 tbsp olive oil
flour to coat meat
1 tbsp mustard powder
salt and pepper to taste
water (if needed)

Ingredients for Pastry

2 cups plain flour
100 gms butter
100 mls sour cream
50 gms stilton
Iced water (if needed, I didn't use any)
2 eggs beaten

Method

Coat steak and kidney pieces in flour seasoned with salt and mustard powder, and brown in batches in a casserole pot or large saucepan in 2 tbsp oil. Remove from pot and add remaining oil, and scrape any stuck bits of the bottom. Add onion, carrots, and rosemary and saute for a minute or two. Add tomato paste and stir in and saute another few minutes. Then add meat (with any resting juices), stock, worcestire sauce, vinegar, and thyme bundle then bring to a boil before turning heat down to a slow simmer. Simmer for 2-3 hours until meat is tender and sauce is thick, but add water in the meantime to prevent sticking if needed. I had to add one cup water after about 1 1/2 hours of simmering. Allow to cool to room temperature, before placing in fridge to chill for an hour or so.

Meanwhile, make pastry by cutting chilled butter in to small cubes and putting in to the flour along with cream and crumbled cheese. Either process till small clumps form, or (as I did) mix using fingertips to rub ingredients in to flour. Pour on to floured bench, and form in to a ball before wrapping in cling film and chilling for at least half an hour.

This amount of pastry and filling was enough for 4 small/medium sized pies (bases and lids). Grease pie ramekins (sp) with butter and after rolling out dough cut rounds to form the pie case. After trimming, I then put them back in the fridge for another half hour. Then assemble pies by putting filling in the cases gently tapping ramekins to settle the filling in to the cases as you go. Egg wash upper rim of pie cases, then place a round pastry lid over pie, trim, then seal edges with a fork. Then thoroughly egg wash top of pies before baking in a 180 degree Celsius oven for around 45 minutes.
 

Morning Glory

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I just love the idea of the blue cheese crust with steak & kidney. I really wouldn't have thought a cheese like stilton would work in pastry - I'd have imagined it would tun it into a stodgy lump. Clearly I'm wrong!
 

MrsDangermouse

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I assume you're using Blue Stilton for this? Thinking about it, White Stilton probably wouldn't be strong enough for the flavour to come through so it must be the blue version.

Blue Stilton is one of those cheeses I don't like to eat but I love to cook with so I think I might give this a go sometime. Thanks for sharing the recipe and photos :okay:
 

murphyscreek

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I assume you're using Blue Stilton for this? Thinking about it, White Stilton probably wouldn't be strong enough for the flavour to come through so it must be the blue version.

Blue Stilton is one of those cheeses I don't like to eat but I love to cook with so I think I might give this a go sometime. Thanks for sharing the recipe and photos :okay:
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Does "Long Clawson" mean anything to you? I don't know it, but just bought it because it was what my supermarket had. It worked anyway, probably more through good luck then good management.
 

MrsDangermouse

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View attachment 40376

View attachment 40377

Does "Long Clawson" mean anything to you? I don't know it, but just bought it because it was what my supermarket had. It worked anyway, probably more through good luck then good management.
Long Clawson is my favourite Stilton dairy :highfive: because its the one we always used to get our cheese from when I was growing up. I never realised they exported all the way to Australia! If you see their White Stilton for sale then give that a go too....its much milder than Blue Stilton (which I personally prefer) and is one my absolute favourite cheeses.

Incidentally there are only 6 dairies allowed to make Stilton - so if its not made by one of them then it can't legally be called Stilton. I was very lucky in that 3 of the dairies were in neighbouring villages to where I grew up. So it was always a bit of a discussion point amongst my parents friends.....where do you get your Stilton? Long Clawson, Cropwell Bishop or Colston Basset - everyone had their own favourite!
 

murphyscreek

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Long Clawson is my favourite Stilton dairy :highfive: because its the one we always used to get our cheese from when I was growing up. I never realised they exported all the way to Australia! If you see their White Stilton for sale then give that a go too....its much milder than Blue Stilton (which I personally prefer) and is one my absolute favourite cheeses.

Incidentally there are only 6 dairies allowed to make Stilton - so if its not made by one of them then it can't legally be called Stilton. I was very lucky in that 3 of the dairies were in neighbouring villages to where I grew up. So it was always a bit of a discussion point amongst my parents friends.....where do you get your Stilton? Long Clawson, Cropwell Bishop or Colston Basset - everyone had their own favourite!
Wow... thanks so much for that info. I actually purchased two small blocks of this, that's why I still had one to photograph. I was so glad of that decision, after tasting a bit of the one I used in the pastry, as it was 80gms and I only used 50. It is so delicious, and am going to savour the remaining piece just as is on plain crackers.
 

ScandiBrit

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Oh this looks devine!

For the non UK residents, what is it like with the perception of kidneys in your country? Here, Denmark they literally give you them for free and are dog or cat food!
I know a kiwi guy here in Copenhagen, he also had a very low tolerance to them!
 

murphyscreek

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Oh this looks devine!

For the non UK residents, what is it like with the perception of kidneys in your country? Here, Denmark they literally give you them for free and are dog or cat food!
I know a kiwi guy here in Copenhagen, he also had a very low tolerance to them!
They are relatively inexpensive, and one of those divisive type of foods where people seem to love them or hate them with a passion. You wouldn't serve them at a dinner party, for instance, without checking with the guests if they were ok with eating them first.
 

TastyReuben

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Oh this looks devine!

For the non UK residents, what is it like with the perception of kidneys in your country? Here, Denmark they literally give you them for free and are dog or cat food!
I know a kiwi guy here in Copenhagen, he also had a very low tolerance to them!
I've only ever seen them for sale at specialty markets. I'm assuming I could ask a proper butcher and he'd save me some, and I guess they'd go for cheap. Organ meats just aren't that popular in the US.

We raised, slaughtered, and butchered our own meat growing up, and the only people who'd eat any offal were my grandparents.
 
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