Turning to pasta from rice

Corzhens

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Whenever there would be a rice shortage, it is understandable for the price of rice to increase. Some wise mothers would then turn to pasta and noodles. I have this notion that the instant noodles in packs came from this occasions that people turn to pasta and noodles when there is a rice shortage.

What we do in those times of saving money on expensive rice is to cook a bundle of pasta and the sauce is cooked separately. Stored in the fridge, the spaghetti can last for days without any change in taste. All we do is to heat the sauce in the pan with some water before mixing the cooked pasta. In 5 minutes, we have a newly-cooked spaghetti.
 

cupcakechef

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I feel like my family has gone the opposite way and we seem to be eating more rice than noodles or pasta! I think it's probably just as a consequence of living in Japan right now. Rice is really the staple of so many dishes here, that having a meal without it seems unfathomable.

I do miss eating pasta so much - but Japanese pasta is delicious, actually!
 

Caribbean girl

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In our country rice is the staple dish. There is seldom a shortage of rice, but sometimes the brown rice becomes scarce because most people have come to realize that brown rice is a healthier choice than white rice. However, white rice is never scarce. Apart from rice, we would normally turn to potatoes. However, pasta, especially macaroni, is still used by many people, mostly on weekends or on special holidays or occasions. It would hardly be used more than once a week, or twice a week at the most.
 

viyogini

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I feel like my family has gone the opposite way and we seem to be eating more rice than noodles or pasta! I think it's probably just as a consequence of living in Japan right now. Rice is really the staple of so many dishes here, that having a meal without it seems unfathomable.

I hear you! I'm in Japan as well, and rice is available everywhere. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack--there is no time when rice isn't involved. Since I'm not a big rice fan, a lot of Japanese friends look at me weird when they ask me about my diet. I tend to substitute moyashi (bean sprouts) or shirataki noodles for pasta when I miss my Mom's Italian cooking. However, I'm surprised by the amount of pasta available at the grocery shops anymore. At the local haunt, there's an entire aisle devoted to noodles, pasta and macaroni. I can even get gnocchi for a super decent price. Actually, the price and quality is better than my hometown in NJ, USA.
 

cupcakechef

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I hear you! I'm in Japan as well, and rice is available everywhere. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack--there is no time when rice isn't involved. Since I'm not a big rice fan, a lot of Japanese friends look at me weird when they ask me about my diet. I tend to substitute moyashi (bean sprouts) or shirataki noodles for pasta when I miss my Mom's Italian cooking. However, I'm surprised by the amount of pasta available at the grocery shops anymore. At the local haunt, there's an entire aisle devoted to noodles, pasta and macaroni. I can even get gnocchi for a super decent price. Actually, the price and quality is better than my hometown in NJ, USA.

Yes! I buy gnocchi here too at the Kaldi international stores, or Seijo Ishii stores...I have both at my local Aeon Mall! I find they usually have it for a decent price!

I find that Japanese food quality is better than anywhere I've lived though, really. Sure, an apple might cost me $3 sometimes but it's gonna be a pretty dang good apple! Same goes for Japanese strawberries - so expensive but I'm addicted!
 
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