What one fruit do you dislike the most?

Francesca

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Fruits I dislike or do not care for:

Bananas, Shiny Apples ( but adore matte skinned splotched red and light Green apples ) and orange melón ( cantelope ).

Interesting post !
Thanks for posting and have a lovely weekend ..
 
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This was a difficult one for me. If I find one that's weird (like dragonfruit). I want to figure out how to highlight it. If it's one that I find inconvenient, maybe I don't use it quite so often. Inconvenient fruits include mangos (which have a massive pit that refuses to come out), kiwi (which have that furry outside), and pomegranate (which require skill to relieve of their treasure, and make permanent stains if you're not careful).

Then, it came to me: Prickly pears! I've tried to work with them, really I have. Detroit has a huge Mexican population, and these are a beloved fruit from south of the border. But, as the name implies, the native version of the fruit has thorns on it. You can buy them in specialty markets without the thorns, but your trouble isn't over. The skin is inedible (as you can imagine, having just had thorns on it). The seeds - the black parts you can make out in the cross-section - are inedible, too...you can break a tooth if you don't take them out. And, the seeds are slimy and hard to work around.

For all the work that's required to work around the bad stuff, the flavor is merely...okay. It's a bit like a bland cantaloupe. I did make salsas with them, but it was so much work, and I couldn't really taste it.

So, if I were stranded in a desert, and prickly pear were the only source of food, I might consider trying to have one. But, until that happens, I will instead use literally any other fruit.

81kXG1b9WLL._SL1500_.jpg
 

morning glory

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If it's one that I find inconvenient, maybe I don't use it quite so often. Inconvenient fruits include mangos (which have a massive pit that refuses to come out), kiwi (which have that furry outside), and pomegranate (which require skill to relieve of their treasure, and make permanent stains if you're not careful).
Mangos are not really an issue. You cut off the 'cheeks' as close to the stone as possible (along the length of the fruit). Then chop as much off as possible of what remains. Its well worth it for the taste, I think. You have to accept that the stone will never come out cleanly. As chef you can suck and chew the remaining bits of flesh from the stone!

Kiwis are very easily peeled. Cut ends off and insert a dessert spoon between peel and flesh and scoop around the flesh:

View: https://youtu.be/MIxdS-xzXbU


Prickly pears are simply not available here as far as I know - but I have to say they really do look difficult!
 

Elawin

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.....kiwi (which have that furry outside), and pomegranate (which require skill to relieve of their treasure, and make permanent stains if you're not careful)......
I always eat the skin of kiwi fruit - you just have to make sure that you give it a thorough wash and make sure you are not allergic to it (which, funnily enough, I am not, in spite of all my other allergies). I cheat with pomegranates, cut them in half and eat them with a spoon.
 

Cinisajoy

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This was a difficult one for me. If I find one that's weird (like dragonfruit). I want to figure out how to highlight it. If it's one that I find inconvenient, maybe I don't use it quite so often. Inconvenient fruits include mangos (which have a massive pit that refuses to come out), kiwi (which have that furry outside), and pomegranate (which require skill to relieve of their treasure, and make permanent stains if you're not careful).

Then, it came to me: Prickly pears! I've tried to work with them, really I have. Detroit has a huge Mexican population, and these are a beloved fruit from south of the border. But, as the name implies, the native version of the fruit has thorns on it. You can buy them in specialty markets without the thorns, but your trouble isn't over. The skin is inedible (as you can imagine, having just had thorns on it). The seeds - the black parts you can make out in the cross-section - are inedible, too...you can break a tooth if you don't take them out. And, the seeds are slimy and hard to work around.

For all the work that's required to work around the bad stuff, the flavor is merely...okay. It's a bit like a bland cantaloupe. I did make salsas with them, but it was so much work, and I couldn't really taste it.

So, if I were stranded in a desert, and prickly pear were the only source of food, I might consider trying to have one. But, until that happens, I will instead use literally any other fruit.

81kXG1b9WLL._SL1500_.jpg
Three words: prickly pear jelly.
Oh and they are very prolific in the western half of Texas. Fields of them and in some places just growing wild beside the road. Oh and you can eat the pads too, commonly known as nopalitos.
When they come in season, did you want the medium priority box or the large priority box full?
 

Francesca

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This was a difficult one for me. If I find one that's weird (like dragonfruit). I want to figure out how to highlight it. If it's one that I find inconvenient, maybe I don't use it quite so often. Inconvenient fruits include mangos (which have a massive pit that refuses to come out), kiwi (which have that furry outside), and pomegranate (which require skill to relieve of their treasure, and make permanent stains if you're not careful).

Then, it came to me: Prickly pears! I've tried to work with them, really I have. Detroit has a huge Mexican population, and these are a beloved fruit from south of the border. But, as the name implies, the native version of the fruit has thorns on it. You can buy them in specialty markets without the thorns, but your trouble isn't over. The skin is inedible (as you can imagine, having just had thorns on it). The seeds - the black parts you can make out in the cross-section - are inedible, too...you can break a tooth if you don't take them out. And, the seeds are slimy and hard to work around.

For all the work that's required to work around the bad stuff, the flavor is merely...okay. It's a bit like a bland cantaloupe. I did make salsas with them, but it was so much work, and I couldn't really taste it.

So, if I were stranded in a desert, and prickly pear were the only source of food, I might consider trying to have one. But, until that happens, I will instead use literally any other fruit.

81kXG1b9WLL._SL1500_.jpg

@The Late Night Gourmet.

I am a grand fan of Pithaya ( Dragon Fruit ), the red and the white .. They are absolutely exquisite. The interiors are similiar to a Kiwi and one can eat the tiny black seeds dots ..

They are stunning in fruit salads coupled with strawberries, papaya, mango, Green melón, Apple, lychees and salad greens like rocket and radicchio. With a subtle vinaigrette .. They are also common in Smoothies and have enormous remedial factors .. Very healthy ..

They are also very common in Phuket Island, Thailand and Bangkok Markets and Southern India as well as Central America, Brazil and The Caribbean & Southern California ..

Prickly pears, not a fan ..

Have a nice evening / day ..

Thanks for posting ..
 

Lynne Guinne

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Mango. Mango and papaya. Fruits my hubby loves and I just...can't. I finally learned how to find a decent mango that will ripen sufficiently for him, but trying to find a proper papaya up here in the north is a fruitless effort. (*ahem* see what I did there? <<<)
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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Mangos don't need peeling - technically that is. the skin is edible, but we usually peel it. but the easiest method we have come across is to slice the length of the fruit with a knife to the stone in bite sized stripes plus one all the way around the equator. now put the fruit in the palm of your hand and slice off strips horizontal to the stone. when you meet the stone, turn over and repeat. if you want chunks rather than slices, then slice across before you put the fruit in the palm of your hand and cut.

Kiwis are very easily peeled. Cut ends off and insert a dessert spoon between peel and flesh and scoop around the flesh:
even easier is to simply treat them like a boiled egg in an egg-cup. slice off the top (make sure not the stalk end). now just eat with a teaspoon scooping out the flesh.
 

Francesca

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Mangos don't need peeling - technically that is. the skin is edible, but we usually peel it. but the easiest method we have come across is to slice the length of the fruit with a knife to the stone in bite sized stripes plus one all the way around the equator. now put the fruit in the palm of your hand and slice off strips horizontal to the stone. when you meet the stone, turn over and repeat. if you want chunks rather than slices, then slice across before you put the fruit in the palm of your hand and cut.


even easier is to simply treat them like a boiled egg in an egg-cup. slice off the top (make sure not the stalk end). now just eat with a teaspoon scooping out the flesh.
@SatNavSaysStraightOn

Thank you for your instructions on Mango slicing. This is how I do it too and slice it in strips longetitude, or dice it in cubes, depending what I am doing with it.

There are also Green mangos which are used in many Latin American dishes and are not peeled and are not sweet as the ripened varieties ..

All my best for a lovely day.
 

Frizz1974

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Pawpaw & papaya, ok in fruit salad but I wouldn't want to eat it alone.

I bought papaya recently to make a face mask (teen daughter had a bunch of girls sleepover) and I diced the remainder & froze it for smoothies.

Dragon fruit has no flavour here. None. Should I treat it like supermarket tomatoes & leave it in the bowl on the bench to ripen for 4-7 days?
 

Francesca

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Pawpaw & papaya, ok in fruit salad but I wouldn't want to eat it alone.

I bought papaya recently to make a face mask (teen daughter had a bunch of girls sleepover) and I diced the remainder & froze it for smoothies.

Dragon fruit has no flavour here. None. Should I treat it like supermarket tomatoes & leave it in the bowl on the bench to ripen for 4-7 days?
Let it ripen and slice it open length wise and and slice the White interior or red interior ( sort of has a Kiwi interior but firmer ) .. Serve with other fruits in a salad. Works incredibly with melón, pineapple, lychee nuts and strawberries. If it does not have an aroma, it is not ripe .. It is extraordinarily aromatic .. And my Grandmothers and Mom, told me as a child, Never purchase Fruit or Veggies that do not have fragrance / or aromas. They are not good quality.

You can also sccop out interior and prepare a Milk Shake with it or Icecream Soda ..

Have a lovely day ..
 
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Frizz1974

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Let it ripen and slice it open length wise and and slice the White interior or red interior ( sort of has a Kiwi interior but firmer ) .. Serve with other fruits in a salad. Works incredibly with melón, pineapple, lychee nuts and strawberries. If it does not have an aroma, it is not ripe .. It is extraordinarily aromatic .. And my Grandmothers and Mom, told me as a child, Never purchase Fruit or Veggies that do not have fragrance / or aromas. They are not good quality.

You can also sccop out interior and prepare a Milk Shake with it or Icecream Soda ..

Have a lovely day ..
Thanks for the info. I'll buy some & leave them at room temp. It's what I do with tomatoes, avocado, banana & soft cheese like Brie or Camembert.
 
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