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The CookingBites Cookalong: Goulash

Discussion in 'Competitions & Challenges, Questions & Quizzes' started by morning glory, Oct 24, 2017.

  1. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Have you ever made Hungarian Goulash? If not, then now is your chance to try! If you have cooked Goulash before, you can share your wisdom and cook along too. The idea of the Cookalong is that members cook a classic recipe within a certain timescale and share their experience. Its a bit of fun and a chance to learn. Please join in!

    This well-known dish has its roots in Hungary. The most common given history for the dish is that it was developed from a beef soup named after the herdsman in Hungary (the Magyar). Beef was cooked and dried out, to provide a portable ingredient. It was then boiled up in water to provide a simple stew. Today, the dish has many variation. Most common is the inclusion of Hungarian paprika and potatoes and some include spaetzels. Although this dish most commonly uses beef, it could also be made with chicken or other meat - and why not a vegan/vegetarian version?

    There is an interesting article here which compares various Chef’s recipes and includes a final tested recipe. I will also post a simple recipe for Goulash below.

    Please add your comments, photos, experiences to this thread. Provisional closing date midnight Saturday 25th November (GMT). Please let us know if you intend to join in.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 5, 2017
  2. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Here is the most basic recipe for Goulash from Larousse Gastronomique:

    20171024_150804.jpg
     
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  3. Francesca

    Francesca Senior Member

    Location:
    Barcelona
    This 9th century beef stew was eaten by Herders, and the Hungarian name which signifies Herders or Shepherds is " Gylyás " = Goulash ..

    Paprika did not come into this récipe until the mid 16th century ..

    There are as many versions as there are people on the planet ..

    Yes, of course I have had it in both Budapest and the Trentino Alto Adige, and Friuli regions of Italy where it is also quite renowned ..

    And I have also had it when I was in Manhattan at the renowned Michelin Lady Chef Lydia Bastianich ´s Restaurant, prior to her restirement ( Her son or daughter have it now ) and her récipe is notorious for she prepared it for the guest of honor, Pope Benedict XVI, who she also prepared this dish for at the Vatican in Roma and at her Manhattan Restaurant ..

    It is not a difficult dish to make and I have her récipe so hopefully I can prepare it ..
     
  4. Yorky

    Yorky Uncomfortably numb

    Quite appropriate for October - Ghoulash!

    This is a pork one I cooked late last year. I'll dig the recipe out later.

    pork goulash s.jpg
     
  5. Yorky

    Yorky Uncomfortably numb

    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 29, 2017
  6. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    I hadn't though of using pork - I have problems using pork fillet in stews. I find it goes sort of 'chalky' and dry in texture if you know what I mean.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 29, 2017
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  7. Yorky

    Yorky Uncomfortably numb

    We have the best pork that I have ever come across here in Thailand, for which I am thankful because the local beef is not good. Imported beef is expensive for stews.
     
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  8. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Senior Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    IMG_0969.JPG

    Here's my interpretation, using beef. I will post the recipe later today. I have to say, after making it, that it doesn't seem all that different from a beef stew. I did what I always do when making a new recipe, consulting various sources to get what seemed to be the most authentic recipe. I used 1/4 cup of Hungarian paprika, and I honestly think I should have used more. :eek: There wasn't any spiciness, but then again, Hungarian paprika isn't spicy. Tasty, but not what I expected (which was: something to blow me away with flavor).

    Here's the recipe.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2017
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  9. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    I thought @Elawin mentioned that Hungarian Paprika has a stronger heat than other paprika. I noticed you use that and that you used quite a lot - yet it wasn't at all hot. Hmmm... paprika isn't really a hot spice in my experience. I think I'm going to be tempted to use chill as well!
     
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  10. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    @The Late Night Gourmet, I noticed you didn't include caraway seeds which are certainly included in many recipes - I will definitely use them. Also - did you read the article I referenced in the top post? It suggests coating the beef in caraway and paprika before frying. This is something I will try.

    My thoughts are that perhaps shouldn't have trimmed away the fat from the meat and that the stock/gravy needs reducing to be much richer. Its hard to say - I'm just going by the photos.
     
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  11. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Senior Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    Thanks for reminding me: I did use caraway seeds! I will update the recipe now. I agree that cooking them along with the beef and paprika at the start would have been better, since it would give them a chance to toast a bit and enhance the flavor.
     
  12. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    I'm going to do a marinade/rub with caraway and paprika for the beef and leave it overnight. Not sure about the rest yet!
     
  13. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    ...on the other hand I may use chicken instead... or venison.
     
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  14. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Senior Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    I've actually revised my opinion of what I made somewhat: it's better the next day than it was the day I made it. This is probably because the ingredients had a chance to integrate overnight. This suggests that what you plan to do - making a marinade of sorts ant letting it rest - could be a way to go (assuming you use a lean meat and don't use the fat the way I did). I do advise massive amounts of paprika, but you can do your own research and come to your own conclusions.
     
  15. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Why do you say that - isn't some fat a good thing in a slow cook? I am hoping to use some shin of beef if I use beef which has a reasonable amount of marbling as well as connective tissue.
     
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