Recipe Charred Chicken Breast with Lavender, Juniper and Orange

Morning Glory

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’En papillote is one of my favourite ways to cook chicken breasts, because it keeps them moist and tender. The charring comes afterwards and you will need a culinary blow-torch to do this (every kitchen should have one). This recipe exploits the affinity between orange and juniper. I added some lavender for a slightly perfumed taste. I’m not certain how well it came through. You could substitute chopped rosemary which is a well known combination with juniper. Serve the chicken hot or cold. I did both.

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Ingredients (serves 1- 2)
For the marinade:
Juice of 2 large oranges
10 juniper berries, crushed
1/4 tsp lavender

For the papillote:
1 large skinless, boneless chicken breast
5 crushed juniper berries
2 cloves of garlic, finely sliced
A few leaves of fresh oregano (optional)
2 - 4 half slices of orange
Salt
Drizzle of olive oil

Method
  1. Place the marinade ingredients in a saucepan and simmer until it becomes slightly syrupy and is reduced by half.
  2. Allow the marinade to cool and then strain it.
  3. Place the chicken breast in a bowl or bag and cover with the marinade. Allow to marinate for at least two hours.
  4. Heat the oven to 180 C.
  5. Take a large sheet of foil (I lined it with baking paper, but you don’t have to). Place the chicken breasts in the centre of the foil and season with salt. Pour the marinade over and add the juniper berries, garlic slices, oregano and orange slices. Drizzle with a little olive oil. Cover with another sheet of foil, tenting it slightly. Crimp the edges of the foil to form a tight seal.
  6. Cook for 30 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through.
  7. Char the top of each chicken breast and the orange slices with a blow-torch. Serve with the juices poured over.

Served cold in a salad:
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Hemulen

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- - -
The charring comes afterwards and you will need a culinary blow-torch to do this (every kitchen should have one). - - -
Looks delicious! I watched Master Chef Finland yesterday and shook my head on the perpetual use of blow-torch. In my opinion (nobody asked for it :D), if it doesn't char naturally (on the pan, oven, open fire or broil), let it be. I'd only use blow-torch for crème brûlée but I see the enticement and aesthetic and culinary value of a rapidly charred coat. Frankly, electric ovens and gas hobs aren't that natural either...
 
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Hemulen

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Not sure. If charring on an open flame is 'ok' then what is the difference. A blow torch is simply a flame...
I'm sorry. You are right. A flame is a flame however it's produced. That wasn't me speaking, it was my invidious left foot :D.
 

LissaC

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You are the winner to me 🥰 Such a“simple” flavor combination that sounds divine. I really want to try this at home.
 

Morning Glory

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I'm sorry. You are right. A flame is a flame however it's produced. That wasn't me speaking, it was my invidious left foot :D.

I don't think you are alone in saying that about blow torching. For sure, its not going to add a wood char or charcoal flavour that you will get from a BBQ/outdoor grill.
 

TastyReuben

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I somewhat feel that way about a kitchen torch, but then again, I pop stuff under the broiler/grill to get a char on it, so... 🤷🏻‍♂️
 

CraigC

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I use a propane torch to lite my charcoal chimney, start my Bayou Classic burner and to char peppers for removing the skin. We have a butane kitchen torch for charring sugar on top of desserts.
 

Morning Glory

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I somewhat feel that way about a kitchen torch, but then again, I pop stuff under the broiler/grill to get a char on it, so... 🤷🏻‍♂️

It does the same as a blow torch except that the blow torch is very fast and so doesn't overcook the food that you have already cooked. Its useful in certain situations.
 
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