Recipe Cinnamon Espresso Ice Cream

The Late Night Gourmet

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In my mind, all ice creams consist of the following components:
  • Cream
  • Sweetener
  • Eggs
  • Vanilla bean (almost always, regardless of the last ingredient)
  • Some sort of flavoring
For cream, I always use half-and-half; you can substitute equal amounts of heavy cream + whole milk if you can't find it, since it's the same thing (that's literally what half-and-half means: half cream, half milk). The proportions are always the same for the first 3 ingredients when I make an ice cream:

1 quart half and half (or 1 cup heavy cream + 1 cup whole milk)
1 cup sugar
6 egg yolks
1 vanilla bean, split and scraped (or 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract)

But, that fifth item is where ice cream becomes something different. With that in mind, I used a recipe I've made many times, and at first I planned to make cinnamon ice cream. Then, I decided I wanted a different flavor. I stirred a single teaspoon of espresso powder into the custard (which you get when all the ingredients are combined in the pot), and it didn't have enough of a coffee flavor. So, I decided to double the quantity.

Ingredients

1 quart half and half (or 1 cup heavy cream + 1 cup whole milk)
1 cup sugar
6 egg yolks
1 vanilla bean, split and scraped (or 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract)
3 cinnamon sticks
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons espresso powder

Directions

  1. In a saucepan, over medium heat, combine the half-and-half, sugar, cinnamon sticks, and vanilla bean with pulp. Bring to a simmer.
  2. In a small mixing bowl, whisk the egg yolks until smooth. Add 1 cup of the hot liquid to the egg yolks in a slow stream, gradually whisking to combine, until smooth. Whisk in the cinnamon powder and espresso powder until fully integrated.
  3. Add the yolk mixture to the saucepan of liquid and whisk until incorporated. Bring the liquid back to simmer and continue to cook for about 5 minutes or until the mixture coats the back of a spoon.
  4. Pour the mixture through a sieve and into a bowl, discarding what the sieve catches. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on top of the mixture. This will prevent a skin from forming while cooling.
  5. Cool the mixture completely. Process the mixture according the ice cream machines instructions.
 
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This looks very good. I was recently given an ice-cream machine but haven't tried it out yet. I think ice-cream could be popular with the grandson although I'm not sure cinnamon would be to his taste. But hubby likes ice-cream too so I will bookmark the recipe. Thanks!
 
This looks very good. I was recently given an ice-cream machine but haven't tried it out yet. I think ice-cream could be popular with the grandson although I'm not sure cinnamon would be to his taste. But hubby likes ice-cream too so I will bookmark the recipe. Thanks!
You can just as easily exclude the cinnamon powder, cinnamon sticks, and espresso powder, and the same recipe will yield an incredible vanilla bean ice cream. I find myself starting with vanilla as a base most of the time, and it hasn't failed me yet. :)
 
Thank you. Do you think I could use cocoa powder in place of the coffee?
Absolutely! This would make it a terrific chocolate ice cream, but you may want to add some sugar to get the flavor you want. The good thing is that, just like a savory dish, you have a chance to taste the ice cream and adjust the flavors when it's still in the custard stage (i.e., step 3 above). In this recipe. I added extra espresso powder to give it more of a coffee flavor while it was still a custard. The same thing would apply to any other flavor you want to use.
 
My problem is the fact I have no ice cream maker. :( But I'm on a quest for churn free ice cream. Nearly there...
I wish I could say that the churning isn't that important, but it really is. I typically put the custard in the freezer, and then scrape down the sides every hour or so as it starts to freeze. Sometimes, if I let it go overnight, it's as hard as concrete the next day. It still tastes good - what I can chisel away, that is - but this is not how ice cream is supposed to be. But, after letting it thaw a bit, I churn it for a few minutes, and the transformation is miraculous. I know there are churn free recipes out there, but I can't vouch for them.
 
View attachment 10053

In my mind, all ice creams consist of the following components:
  • Cream
  • Sweetener
  • Eggs
  • Vanilla bean (almost always, regardless of the last ingredient)
  • Some sort of flavoring
For cream, I always use half-and-half; you can substitute equal amounts of heavy cream + whole milk if you can't find it, since it's the same thing (that's literally what half-and-half means: half cream, half milk). The proportions are always the same for the first 3 ingredients when I make an ice cream:

1 quart half and half (or 1 cup heavy cream + 1 cup whole milk)
1 cup sugar
6 egg yolks
1 vanilla bean, split and scraped (or 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract)

But, that fifth item is where ice cream becomes something different. With that in mind, I used a recipe I've made many times, and at first I planned to make cinnamon ice cream. Then, I decided I wanted a different flavor. I stirred a single teaspoon of espresso powder into the custard (which you get when all the ingredients are combined in the pot), and it didn't have enough of a coffee flavor. So, I decided to double the quantity.

Ingredients

1 quart half and half (or 1 cup heavy cream + 1 cup whole milk)
1 cup sugar
6 egg yolks
1 vanilla bean, split and scraped (or 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract)
3 cinnamon sticks
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons espresso powder

Directions

  1. In a saucepan, over medium heat, combine the half-and-half, sugar, cinnamon sticks, and vanilla bean with pulp. Bring to a simmer.
  2. In a small mixing bowl, whisk the egg yolks until smooth. Add 1 cup of the hot liquid to the egg yolks in a slow stream, gradually whisking to combine, until smooth. Whisk in the cinnamon powder and espresso powder until fully integrated.
  3. Add the yolk mixture to the saucepan of liquid and whisk until incorporated. Bring the liquid back to simmer and continue to cook for about 5 minutes or until the mixture coats the back of a spoon.
  4. Pour the mixture into a bowl and place a piece of plastic wrap directly on top of the mixture. This will prevent a skin from forming while cooling.
  5. Cool the mixture completely. Process the mixture according the ice cream machines instructions.


@The Late Night Gourmet

Sounds fabulous ..

Have a nice day ..
 
@morning glory: someone on my creative cooking forum at work just posted this no-churn recipe:

Helado de coco
Coconut ice cream

Ingredients
  • 16 oz. whipping cream, very cold
  • A 15 oz. can Cream of Coconut (crema de coco)
Directions
Beat cream until very thick and forms peaks.

Place the Cream of Coconut in a bowl and mix with a whisk. Add ¼ of the whipped cream and mix well. Add ¼ more of the cream and mix well again.

Gently fold in the remaining cream. Pour into a mold or container. Freeze for 8 to 10 hours or overnight. Stored in a covered container in the freezer.

Notes

You cannot substitute the Cream of Coconut or whipping cream in this recipe. That's what makes it an ice cream without a machine. Those two ingredients make it possible.
 
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