Recipe & Video Lady's Thigh Meatballs - Turkish Fried Kadın Budu Kofta

Hungry Man

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View: https://youtu.be/jYHNhlIJ0_8


Ingredients:
  • 500 g lean ground beef (low fat)
  • 1/2 cup rice
  • 1 onion
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1.5 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 cups of frying oil
Instructions:
  1. Soak the rice in salted water and set aside
  2. Finely chop the onions and heat up a pan with 1 tbsp olive oil
  3. Cook the onions until translucent and then add half of the ground beef into the pan
  4. Stir and break apart the ground beef until it’s cooked and set aside to cool down
  5. Wash and drain the rice and transfer to a pot with 1 cup of water
  6. Boil the rice until soft and drain the excess water
  7. Transfer the cooked ground beef into a large bowl
  8. Add the remaining raw ground beef and crack open 1 egg into the bowl
  9. Add 1 tsp cumin, ½ tsp black pepper and 1 tsp salt
  10. With your hands, mix and knead the mixture until combined
  11. Add the cooked rice and mix until all ingredients are combined
  12. Cover and let it rest in the fridge for 30 minutes
  13. Shape the mixture into large eliptic meatballs, almost the size of the palm of your hand
  14. In a small bowl, whisk 2 eggs and prepare a plate with 1 cup of flour for coating
  15. Dip and cover the meatballs with flour first
  16. Heat up the oil in a large pan to 160°C /320°F
  17. Cover the meatballs with beaten eggs and transfer to hot oil
  18. Fry the meatballs in batches until golden
  19. Transfer to a paper towel, serve warm or cold
 

Timenspace

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View: https://youtu.be/jYHNhlIJ0_8


Ingredients:
  • 500 g lean ground beef (low fat)
  • 1/2 cup rice
  • 1 onion
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1.5 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 cups of frying oil
Instructions:
  1. Soak the rice in salted water and set aside
  2. Finely chop the onions and heat up a pan with 1 tbsp olive oil
  3. Cook the onions until translucent and then add half of the ground beef into the pan
  4. Stir and break apart the ground beef until it’s cooked and set aside to cool down
  5. Wash and drain the rice and transfer to a pot with 1 cup of water
  6. Boil the rice until soft and drain the excess water
  7. Transfer the cooked ground beef into a large bowl
  8. Add the remaining raw ground beef and crack open 1 egg into the bowl
  9. Add 1 tsp cumin, ½ tsp black pepper and 1 tsp salt
  10. With your hands, mix and knead the mixture until combined
  11. Add the cooked rice and mix until all ingredients are combined
  12. Cover and let it rest in the fridge for 30 minutes
  13. Shape the mixture into large eliptic meatballs, almost the size of the palm of your hand
  14. In a small bowl, whisk 2 eggs and prepare a plate with 1 cup of flour for coating
  15. Dip and cover the meatballs with flour first
  16. Heat up the oil in a large pan to 160°C /320°F
  17. Cover the meatballs with beaten eggs and transfer to hot oil
  18. Fry the meatballs in batches until golden
  19. Transfer to a paper towel, serve warm or cold
Sounds amazing.

Is the olive oil for the onions only?

My Grandma used to make Kofta ( she called it Kiufte in Bulgaria )...her take was without cumin. The cooked rice I don't remember, will ask my Mom...she dipped only in flour and then fried...were great.

There might be thousands of versions...
 

Hungry Man

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Sounds amazing.

Is the olive oil for the onions only?

My Grandma used to make Kofta ( she called it Kiufte in Bulgaria )...her take was without cumin. The cooked rice I don't remember, will ask my Mom...she dipped only in flour and then fried...were great.

There might be thousands of versions...
Yes, the olive oil is to cook the onions, the other one (for frying) is sunflower oil. This is quite a traditional dish in Turkey and this is the authentic recipe for Turkey. There must be different versions in the Balkans or Bulgaria, like many other Turkish recipes.
 

The Late Night Gourmet

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Yes, the olive oil is to cook the onions, the other one (for frying) is sunflower oil. This is quite a traditional dish in Turkey and this is the authentic recipe for Turkey. There must be different versions in the Balkans or Bulgaria, like many other Turkish recipes.

I was wondering about the name of the recipe, but you do explain that in the YouTube text for your latest excellent video. My only question is about the flour and egg. Usually with fried things, the sequence is:
  • flour - to dry up the surface so it will accept the egg more readily.
  • egg - to create a sticky surface for the final coating
  • flour (or other coating) - to create a crunchy exterior
Here, you have just the first 2 steps. I do see that this has the look and feel of kofta I have seen, though, so I assume it's intentional.
 
Last edited:

Timenspace

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Yes, the olive oil is to cook the onions, the other one (for frying) is sunflower oil. This is quite a traditional dish in Turkey and this is the authentic recipe for Turkey. There must be different versions in the Balkans or Bulgaria, like many other Turkish recipes.
Thank you. Agree.
 

Hungry Man

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I was wondering about the name of the recipe, but you do explain that in the YouTube text for your latest excellent video. My only question is about the flour and egg. Usually with fried things, the sequence is:
  • flour - to dry up the surface so it will accept the egg more readily.
  • egg - to create a sticky surface for the final coating
  • flour (or other coating) - to create a crunchy exterior
Here, you have just the first 2 steps. I do see that this has the look and feel of kofta I have seen, though, so I assume it's intentional.
I know, some people also follow the above sequence, but this one is the original recipe. It's an old recipe from the Ottoman times and I assume this is how they liked it at the time 😊
 
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