The CookingBites recipe challenge: root vegetables

TastyReuben

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Getting ready for my third entry:
79211
 

Morning Glory

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Hemulen

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I see what you are doing here Hemulen. Very clever. You know me and have a very good memory. For those who don't know: salsify is one of my favourite vegetables. It possibly ranks as top of my list of root vegetables. Difficult to find in the UK and possibly elsewhere (except in Finland!).
I'm certainly trying to impress you, MG :D. Herrings aren't always what they seem 🐟... I know I'm lucky when it comes to salsifies (mustajuuri = black salsify). They're grown here, they keep well when stored and roots are available until late spring in bigger supermarkets. The price is around 9€/kg. I'll make black salsify soup for the challenge - and maybe an updated vegan herring recipe.

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Timenspace

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We call the celery root, the celery 'head'. I recently bought a giant 1,3 kg one, peeled, chopped and froze most of it. I love it fresh and in soups.

I hope to get to try out something with it on Wednesday, if circumstances permit.
 

Timenspace

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Recipe - Beet&celery soup
I am on my laptop, and there was an old post of mine hanging, so I just released it. I did not make the salad as I intended, as the celery had stood in the fridge a day too long, or two. I prepared this lovely soup instead. The rest of the celery is safely frozen.

79225

Sorry for the messy bowl, I just noticed it, it was a rush, and I just did not wipe it out properly. But it tastes amazing. I eat it whenever I am home.
 

TastyReuben

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Recipe - Turnip Puff

One of the forum members (with a name that might rhyme with "lacyhog) was kind enough to gift me some cookbooks, which was much appreciated. This recipe is from one of those, a church cookbook from Houston.

Flipping through, I saw a lot of potato salads, pecan pies...the usual church cookbook fare (nothing wrong with that). Then I turned a page, and there it was...Turnip Puff!

I was instantly transported back to about 1975 or so. My grandmother made turnip puff, all the women at church made turnip puff, my mom made turnip puff. Everybody made turnip puff, we ate it all the time, but somehow, for whatever reason, it was one of those things I just sort of...forgot about after leaving home.

When this challenge was announced, I knew at least one thing I would make...Turnip Puff! Here it is:



Sorry that second pic is so dark, but them's the breaks.

It's a nice alternative to a heavier, potato-based dish, with that little bite that turnips have. This was puffed up a bit more, but it did deflate a little as it cooled, but it tasted exactly like what I remembered - a time machine in food form.
 

JAS_OH1

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Recipe - Turnip Puff

One of the forum members (with a name that might rhyme with "lacyhog) was kind enough to gift me some cookbooks, which was much appreciated. This recipe is from one of those, a church cookbook from Houston.

Flipping through, I saw a lot of potato salads, pecan pies...the usual church cookbook fare (nothing wrong with that). Then I turned a page, and there it was...Turnip Puff!

I was instantly transported back to about 1975 or so. My grandmother made turnip puff, all the women at church made turnip puff, my mom made turnip puff. Everybody made turnip puff, we ate it all the time, but somehow, for whatever reason, it was one of those things I just sort of...forgot about after leaving home.

When this challenge was announced, I knew at least one thing I would make...Turnip Puff! Here it is:



Sorry that second pic is so dark, but them's the breaks.

It's a nice alternative to a heavier, potato-based dish, with that little bite that turnips have. This was puffed up a bit more, but it did deflate a little as it cooled, but it tasted exactly like what I remembered - a time machine in food form.
I'm thinking you meant 1875, since you are a time traveler like me, LOL. But that looks dagummed great!

I am soooo glad it wasn't carrots or sweet potatoes! I would have been such a terrible judge for this one, as I would have had to say, "except for this root vegetable, that vegetable, or this other vegetable...
 

karadekoolaid

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Earwigho, again.
Morrocan style Root Vegetable Soup with Ras-al-Hanout
This recipe was originally for a lady who wanted to eat low-calorie soups, and she wanted everything blended to a cream.
I don´t know how low-calorie it is, and to be honest, it doesn´t bother me, but it is very tasty.
If you want to leave the root veggies whole, be my guest.
79246
 

caseydog

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Recipe - Turnip Puff

One of the forum members (with a name that might rhyme with "lacyhog) was kind enough to gift me some cookbooks, which was much appreciated. This recipe is from one of those, a church cookbook from Houston.

Flipping through, I saw a lot of potato salads, pecan pies...the usual church cookbook fare (nothing wrong with that). Then I turned a page, and there it was...Turnip Puff!

I was instantly transported back to about 1975 or so. My grandmother made turnip puff, all the women at church made turnip puff, my mom made turnip puff. Everybody made turnip puff, we ate it all the time, but somehow, for whatever reason, it was one of those things I just sort of...forgot about after leaving home.

When this challenge was announced, I knew at least one thing I would make...Turnip Puff! Here it is:



Sorry that second pic is so dark, but them's the breaks.

It's a nice alternative to a heavier, potato-based dish, with that little bite that turnips have. This was puffed up a bit more, but it did deflate a little as it cooled, but it tasted exactly like what I remembered - a time machine in food form.

I don't know how old that cookbook is. It says "35th Anniversary," but I don't know, "anniversary of what?" The church was founded in 1852. Maybe they just keep adding recipes to it. 🤷‍♂️

CD
 

TastyReuben

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I don't know how old that cookbook is. It says "35th Anniversary," but I don't know, "anniversary of what?" The church was founded in 1852. Maybe they just keep adding recipes to it. 🤷‍♂️

CD
You mean it's not from 1887? I thought the building on the front look awfully modern! :laugh:

Actually, you may be thinking of a different church? This one has a copyright of 2008 (so not that long ago) and it contains an "Our History" that talks about starting up the church in 1973.

Tomorrow, I'll dig through the other ones and find the mystery church.
 

caseydog

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You mean it's not from 1887? I thought the building on the front look awfully modern! :laugh:

Actually, you may be thinking of a different church? This one has a copyright of 2008 (so not that long ago) and it contains an "Our History" that talks about starting up the church in 1973.

Tomorrow, I'll dig through the other ones and find the mystery church.

DOH, I am thinking of a different church -- Salem Lutheran Church. I don't know if I sent you a cookbook from there. St. Timothy is a relatively "new" church. My parents went there. My sister goes to the church I was thinking of, that was founded in 1852.

Brain fart.

CD
 

caseydog

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Beef and Root Vegetable Stew (recipe thread coming soon)

Slowly beer-braised beef, rutabaga, parsnip and carrot -- plus a little ground ginger for seasoning. Four root veggies. :dance:

It was my first experience with parsnips (that I can recall) and rutabaga. I liked them. Carrots... meh (not a carrot fan, myself). The broth was excellent -- very different than any stew broth I've ever had... in a very good way.

RootStew001.jpg


CD
 
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kaneohegirlinaz

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Beef and Root Vegetable Stew (recipe thread coming soon)

Slowly beer-braised beef, rutabaga, parsnip and carrot -- plus a little ground ginger for seasoning. Four root veggies. :dance:

It was my first experience with parsnips (that I can recall) and rutabaga. I liked them. Carrots... meh (not a carrot fan, myself). The broth was excellent -- very different than any stew broth I've ever had... in a very good way.

View attachment 79253

CD
Dawg, is that your 5 1/2 qt dutch oven?
How big of a batch did this make? It looks like a good 8 portions, can't wait to see the recipe, I've never had parsnips nor rutabagas before.
 

karadekoolaid

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Beef and Root Vegetable Stew (recipe thread coming soon)

Slowly beer-braised beef, rutabaga, parsnip and carrot -- plus a little ground ginger for seasoning. Four root veggies. :dance:

It was my first experience with parsnips (that I can recall) and rutabaga. I liked them. Carrots... meh (not a carrot fan, myself). The broth was excellent -- very different than any stew broth I've ever had... in a very good way.

View attachment 79253

CD
Parsnips are really, really tasty. First thing I bought when I arrived in Cinci - and promptly roasted them with just a touch of honey.
As for rutabaga (swede ) it´s got a lovely, slightly sweet, earthy flavour. I seem to remember reading that swedes in France were only used to feed livestock!
 

TastyReuben

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I'm another one who loves parsnip - tastes sort of like a cross between a carrot and a turnip. Even just peeling one, and the smell that comes off them from that is just wonderful.
 
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