Recipe Vegetarian Ethiopian Black Eyed Pea Stew

Mountain Cat

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I adapted a dish originally made by the chef Marcus Samuelsson.

My changes (in addition to downsizing a bit as 8-10 servings for one person would be overkill) were using a serrano pepper instead of habanaro (it’s what the supermarket had), and using veggie broth instead of chicken stock, because I wanted to go vegetarian with this dish, but chicken should also be good. My hand slipped in decanting the coconut milk, and so there’s a bit more, but I decided what th’ hey. (It is supposed to be the same amount of coconut milk as the broth.) The recipe doesn’t call for pre-soaking the beans (black-eyed peas are actually technically beans) but I did it anyway. Pre-soaking may also reduce flatulence if you are prone. The recipe’s simmering/draining step may well take care of this.

ethiopian-done.jpg


Berbere is a peppery Ethiopian spice mixture containing paprika, cumin, onion, coriander, peppers, and other spices.

Prep Time: Overnight soaking, with the rest of the prep taking while the peas simmer in the first stage.
Cook time: 35+2+5+20+10 = 72 minutes. Approx 1.25 hours.
Rest Time: Eh.
Serves: 4-6.
Leftovers: Yes. The stew will thicken up when refrigerated.


Vegetarian Ethiopian Black-Eyed Pea Stew
  • 8 ounces black-eyed peas
  • Sea salt, a pinch.
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter (or ghee, or if vegan or not doing dairy: simply use cooking oil)
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 1 1/4 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 serrano chile, seeded and diced (you can sub in a small habanero – preferred, jalapeno, or other)
  • 1.5 teaspoons berbere seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 2 medium tomatoes, chopped (try to find flavorful ones, it is hard in the winter.)
  • 1 cup canned coconut milk
  • 0.75 cup veggie broth (chicken would be fine for omnivores)
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro, stems and all – optional
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced

Soak the black-eyed peas overnight and rinse. This will largely remove anti-nutrients from the beans. They will expand! So take that into account when finding a suitable container.

Drain.

In a large pot, add the peas and add water to cover. Bring to a boil on your cooktop, and reduce heat to a simmer, and simmer until soft or tender. About 35 minutes. (They will cook further later).

Add a pinch of salt, mix, and let stand 5 minutes before draining thoroughly.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, melt the butter or ghee (if vegan, use a high heat oil. Add the onion, garlic, ginger and chile and cook on medium, stirring occasionally, until the onions are translucent, which will be about 10 minutes.

Add the berbere and turmeric. Stir for about 2 minutes, until you can appreciate fragrance.

Add those tomatoes and stir for about 5 minutes.

Add the liquids (coconut milk and stock), and boil. Drop this back down to a mild simmer, and stir periodically. You want to thicken the sauce some. This will take approximately 20 minutes.

Add the peas to the sauce (or vice versa), and cook at medium low, stirring occasionally. Do this for about 10 minutes, so that all the food is hot, and the peas are well-coated with their sauce.

If you know you and guests will likely eat the whole dish in one sitting, add the scallions and cilantro now. r If you are rather certain of leftovers, plate out the stew into bowls, and then add the scallions and cilantro to each individual bowl on top as served. (Actually, I think it would look better this way to begin with.)


ethiopian-pre-peas.jpg

Photo above: Just beginning to simmer.

VERDICT: I liked this a lot. One can add more heat to the dish, but the heat that is there will grow. There is plenty of flavor nuance. Definitely a keeper.

ethiopian-post-peas.jpg

Photo above: Peas are in the pot.

ethiopian-done2.jpg

Served!!
 
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TodayInTheKitchen

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todayinthekitchen.com
I adapted a dish originally made by the chef Marcus Samuelsson.

My changes (in addition to downsizing a bit as 8-10 servings for one person would be overkill) were using a serrano pepper instead of habanaro (it’s what the supermarket had), and using veggie broth instead of chicken stock, because I wanted to go vegetarian with this dish, but chicken should also be good. My hand slipped in decanting the coconut milk, and so there’s a bit more, but I decided what th’ hey. (It is supposed to be the same amount of coconut milk as the broth.) The recipe doesn’t call for pre-soaking the beans (black-eyed peas are actually technically beans) but I did it anyway. Pre-soaking may also reduce flatulence if you are prone. The recipe’s simmering/draining step may well take care of this.

View attachment 37514

Berbere is a peppery Ethiopian spice mixture containing paprika, cumin, onion, coriander, peppers, and other spices.

Prep Time: Overnight soaking, with the rest of the prep taking while the peas simmer in the first stage.
Cook time: 35+2+5+20+10 = 72 minutes. Approx 1.25 hours.
Rest Time: Eh.
Serves: 4-6.
Leftovers: Yes. The stew will thicken up when refrigerated.


Vegetarian Ethiopian Black-Eyed Pea Stew
  • 8 ounces black-eyed peas
  • Sea salt, a pinch.
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter (or ghee, or if vegan or not doing dairy: simply use cooking oil)
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 1 1/4 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 serrano chile, seeded and diced (you can sub in a small habanero – preferred, jalapeno, or other)
  • 1.5 teaspoons berbere seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 2 medium tomatoes, chopped (try to find flavorful ones, it is hard in the winter.)
  • 1 cup canned coconut milk
  • 0.75 cup veggie broth (chicken would be fine for omnivores)
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro, stems and all – optional
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced

Soak the black-eyed peas overnight and rinse. This will largely remove anti-nutrients from the beans. They will expand! So take that into account when finding a suitable container.

Drain.

In a large pot, add the peas and add water to cover. Bring to a boil on your cooktop, and reduce heat to a simmer, and simmer until soft or tender. About 35 minutes. (They will cook further later).

Add a pinch of salt, mix, and let stand 5 minutes before draining thoroughly.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, melt the butter or ghee (if vegan, use a high heat oil. Add the onion, garlic, ginger and chile and cook on medium, stirring occasionally, until the onions are translucent, which will be about 10 minutes.

Add the berbere and turmeric. Stir for about 2 minutes, until you can appreciate fragrance.

Add those tomatoes and stir for about 5 minutes.

Add the liquids (coconut milk and stock), and boil. Drop this back down to a mild simmer, and stir periodically. You want to thicken the sauce some. This will take approximately 20 minutes.

Add the peas to the sauce (or vice versa), and cook at medium low, stirring occasionally. Do this for about 10 minutes, so that all the food is hot, and the peas are well-coated with their sauce.

If you know you and guests will likely eat the whole dish in one sitting, add the scallions and cilantro now. r If you are rather certain of leftovers, plate out the stew into bowls, and then add the scallions and cilantro to each individual bowl on top as served. (Actually, I think it would look better this way to begin with.)


View attachment 37515
Photo above: Just beginning to simmer.

VERDICT: I liked this a lot. One can add more heat to the dish, but the heat that is there will grow. There is plenty of flavor nuance. Definitely a keeper.

View attachment 37516
Photo above: Peas are in the pot.

View attachment 37517
Served!!
Well done Mountain Cat ! I love how the color of the "beans" match the coconut mixture. The coconut, turmeric, and hot peppers give this dish an Indian feel. You are right though...This is a definite keeper.
 

Morning Glory

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I guess I'm a lazy cook, too many things or methods I walk away. I admire your efforts.

Russ
I think sometimes that recipes can make things seem more complicated than they are. The process here is quite straightforward really and very similar to making a curry:
  • Onions/ginger/garlic & chillies cooked in ghee.
  • Add spices then tomatoes.
  • Add coconut milk and stock. Simmer until it thickens.
  • Add the cooked beans.
 

TastyReuben

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I guess I'm a lazy cook, too many things or methods I walk away. I admire your efforts.

Russ
I can be that way at times. I can look at a recipe, and if it's 15 ingredients or more, I think, "Well that'll take an hour just to gather all that!" - same if there're a lot of steps; even if no single step is too involved, if I'm required to do a lot of different things along the way, to transform something from ingredients to dish, I may skip it.

One thing I really do dislike...recipes that use other recipes as ingredients or inputs, as in:

1 lb ground beef
1 tsp salt
1 recipe Chilean Wow sauce, found here

with a link to another recipe. If I have to make a dish in order to make another dish, I'm not doing it. It may seem weird/petty, but just list the recipe right there, don't send me off on a quest to another website (or another page in a cookbook). That's a guarantee that I won't make that dish.

This soup, though, looks really good, and I'd make that. Well done, Mountain Cat!
 

rascal

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I can be that way at times. I can look at a recipe, and if it's 15 ingredients or more, I think, "Well that'll take an hour just to gather all that!" - same if there're a lot of steps; even if no single step is too involved, if I'm required to do a lot of different things along the way, to transform something from ingredients to dish, I may skip it.

One thing I really do dislike...recipes that use other recipes as ingredients or inputs, as in:

1 lb ground beef
1 tsp salt
1 recipe Chilean Wow sauce, found here

with a link to another recipe. If I have to make a dish in order to make another dish, I'm not doing it. It may seem weird/petty, but just list the recipe right there, don't send me off on a quest to another website (or another page in a cookbook). That's a guarantee that I won't make that dish.

This soup, though, looks really good, and I'd make that. Well done, Mountain Cat!
Another thing we have in common,lol.

Russ
 

Elawin

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Joined
1 Apr 2016
Local time
1:12 AM
Messages
3,724
Location
London/Essex border, UK
One thing I really do dislike...recipes that use other recipes as ingredients or inputs, as in:

1 lb ground beef
1 tsp salt
1 recipe Chilean Wow sauce, found here

with a link to another recipe. If I have to make a dish in order to make another dish, I'm not doing it. It may seem weird/petty, but just list the recipe right there, don't send me off on a quest to another website (or another page in a cookbook). That's a guarantee that I won't make that dish.

This soup, though, looks really good, and I'd make that. Well done, Mountain Cat!
That doesn't bother me in the slightest. I often blend my own spice mixes or make my own sauces to use in a dish, mainly because shop-bought equivalents usually include some sort of nasty chemicals or contain ingredients I'm allergic to or just don't like.
 
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