What omnivores get wrong about vegetarian cooking

Dive Bar Casanova

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 Mar 2019
Local time
12:38 AM
Messages
513
Location
Hollywood Ca
BTW before I forget: I use Vegetarian cooking stock over vegetarian cooking broth and it makes all the difference in the world.
Now, good luck finding it.
Out here it's available at Smart and Final aka Fart and Smile.
$2 more per container for the stock. Worth $10 more IMHO.
829919f883b45f53ec167d653d4b92ec2056e96ca806e12a83.jpg


I'm guilty:
At the football pot lucks the food everyone brings is amazing, off the chain delicious. A few guys would occasionally bring dates along and the date may ask if anything is Vegetarian. "Vegetarian?,, Hell lady, the chili in the red crock pot is Vegan. But don't tell anybody." -I'd try to quietly and arrogantly respond with shameful, caviler pride.

Impossible "meat" goes so well in chili too. Goes better than real meat in my Chili recipe. OK, ok,,,,, in my wifes chili recipe.
 
Last edited:

Morning Glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Local time
8:38 AM
Messages
38,576
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
BTW before I forget: I use Vegetarian cooking stock over vegetarian cooking broth and it makes all the difference in the world.
Now, good luck finding it.
Out here it's available at Smart and Final aka Fart and Smile.
$2 more per container for the stock. Worth $10 more IMHO.
View attachment 54784

I'm guilty:
At the football pot lucks the food everyone brings is amazing, off the chain delicious. A few guys would occasionally bring dates along and the date may ask if anything is Vegetarian. "Vegetarian?,, Hell lady, the chili in the red crock pot is Vegan. But don't tell anybody." -I'd try to quietly and arrogantly respond with shameful, caviler pride.

Impossible "meat" goes so well in chili too. Goes better than real meat in my Chili recipe. OK, ok,,,,, in my wifes chili recipe.

What is the difference between stock and broth? In the UK we don't tend to use the word broth very much. There is a specific soup known as Scotch broth but generally we don't use that word. Maybe its used more in Scotland - not sure.
 

Dive Bar Casanova

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 Mar 2019
Local time
12:38 AM
Messages
513
Location
Hollywood Ca
What is the difference between stock and broth? In the UK we don't tend to use the word broth very much. There is a specific soup known as Scotch broth but generally we don't use that word. Maybe its used more in Scotland - not sure.
Broth is clear & water like, stock has rich color, more body and more flavor. At least what I have available is. Makes a big taste difference in my soups, stews and chilies.
 

TastyReuben

Nosh 'n' Splosh
Joined
15 Jul 2019
Local time
3:38 AM
Messages
9,380
Location
Ohio, US

TastyReuben

Nosh 'n' Splosh
Joined
15 Jul 2019
Local time
3:38 AM
Messages
9,380
Location
Ohio, US
Link didn't work...
I'll post the, uh, meat of the matter:

They contain different ingredients.​

While the difference between stock and broth is minimal, the two cooking liquids are made from different ingredients. According to F&WExecutive Food Editor Kate Heddings, stock needs to be made with bones, in addition to a mirepoix, a mix of carrots, onions and celery. At its most basic, broth is simply any liquid that meat has been cooked in. However, the most common way to make broth is take stock and add additional meat, vegetables and salt to the liquid itself (traditional stock is unseasoned).


They can have different textures.​

Stock develops a substantive body as the bones and any attached cartilage release collagen and gelatin into the liquid while cooking. If you happen to make broth without using stock, it will have a different texture and lack the sumptuousness that stock provides.

They are used differently in the kitchen.​

According to Heddings, “Broth is something you sip and stock is something you cook with.” Stock is used as a base in sauces and soups, but its role is to provide body rather than flavor. Broth, on the other hand, is designed to be flavorful and tasty enough to simply drink by itself, which is why the additional salt is so important.

That's what the fine folks at F&W say. For me - stock is broth on steroids. :)
 

Morning Glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Local time
8:38 AM
Messages
38,576
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
I'll post the, uh, meat of the matter:

They contain different ingredients.​

While the difference between stock and broth is minimal, the two cooking liquids are made from different ingredients. According to F&WExecutive Food Editor Kate Heddings, stock needs to be made with bones, in addition to a mirepoix, a mix of carrots, onions and celery. At its most basic, broth is simply any liquid that meat has been cooked in. However, the most common way to make broth is take stock and add additional meat, vegetables and salt to the liquid itself (traditional stock is unseasoned).


They can have different textures.​

Stock develops a substantive body as the bones and any attached cartilage release collagen and gelatin into the liquid while cooking. If you happen to make broth without using stock, it will have a different texture and lack the sumptuousness that stock provides.

They are used differently in the kitchen.​

According to Heddings, “Broth is something you sip and stock is something you cook with.” Stock is used as a base in sauces and soups, but its role is to provide body rather than flavor. Broth, on the other hand, is designed to be flavorful and tasty enough to simply drink by itself, which is why the additional salt is so important.

That's what the fine folks at F&W say. For me - stock is broth on steroids. :)

I think we may have unearthed yet another difference between US and UK definitions.
 
Top Bottom