Recipe Tomato Garlic Prosciutto Frittata

flyinglentris

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Tomato Garlic Prosciutto Frittata:

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Ingredients:

1) Eggs - 3
2) Tomato, Roma, divided - 1
3) Garlic, divided - 8 to 10 cloves
4) Prosciutto, divided - 1 long slice
4) Flour - 1/8 cup
5) Baking soda - 1/2 tspn.
6) Ricotta cheese - 1/2 cup
7) Feta cheese - 1/2 cup
8) Butter - 1 tblspn.
9) Thyme - 1 pinch
10) Oregano - 1 tspn.
11) Rosemary - 2 pinches
12) Chervil - 1 pinch
13) Basil - 1 pinch


Procedure:

-- Preparation --

1) Dice up the tomato and garlic and mix together.
2) Cut the prosciutto in half.
3) Dice up 1/2 the prosciutto and julienne cut the other half.
4) Sift together the flour and baking soda.
5) Mix together all the spices.
6) Melt the butter.
7) Oil a baking pan or dish.
8) Whip the eggs to a consistent yellow smoothness.
9) Preheat oven to 350F.

-- Frittata --

10) Blend the flour and baking soda into the whipped eggs.
11) Stir in the butter, ricotta and feta cheeses and spices.
12) Pour 1/2 the mixture into the baking pan or dish.
13) Mix 1/2 of the tomato and garlic into the remaining half.
14) Mix in the diced prosciutto.
15) Pour the remaining half over the first half in the pan or dish.
16) Distribute the remaining tomato and garlic over the top.
17) Distribute the julienne cut prosciutto over the top.
18) Bake the frittata until it puffs in the center.

NOTE: The frittata should not wobble when it is done. Use this as a test for completeness of baking. Bake for about 30 to 45 minutes.

19) Allow to cool for about 10 to 20 minutes.

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20) Cut out pieces and plate.
21) Serve.
 

flyinglentris

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I've never seen flour and baking soda in a frittata before, that's unique for sure.

The baking soda and flour are meant to make the frittata rise and puff up. However, I think this would have been more effective in a deeper frittata, maybe about 3" deep. I made mine more shallow, because there is only me to eat it. Often, a frittata is meant to feed anywhere from 6 to 12 people and they are made deeper and served in smaller slices.
 

garlichead

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The baking soda and flour are meant to make the frittata rise and puff up. However, I think this would have been more effective in a deeper frittata, maybe about 3" deep. I made mine more shallow, because there is only me to eat it. Often, a frittata is meant to feed anywhere from 6 to 12 people and they are made deeper and served in smaller slices.
By all means do whatever you want, you are the one in charge and I believe in experimentation. Personally I wouldn't have done that. Instead just used a frying pan that I would suspect would give me a depth that would resemble what a frittata would look like and in this case a smaller fry pan. I would have sauteed the tomato and garlic in your recipe then added the eggs, then the prosciutto, cheese and herbs and just cook the bottom slightly then put in a 400 degree oven to finish. Those eggs would have puffed up easily and probably given you a better result. Just my opinion.
 

flyinglentris

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By all means do whatever you want, you are the one in charge and I believe in experimentation. Personally I wouldn't have done that. Instead just used a frying pan that I would suspect would give me a depth that would resemble what a frittata would look like and in this case a smaller fry pan. I would have sauteed the tomato and garlic in your recipe then added the eggs, then the cheese and herbs and just cook the bottom slightly then put in a 400 degree oven to finish. Those eggs would have puffed up easily and probably given you a better result. Just my opinion.

You might be right on that score. When I researched frittatas, which I've never made before, I've found a mix of different approaches. And cast iron deep frying pans were often recommended to get the frittata done quicker with a better rise or puff. Next time I do a frittata, I will try a different method. I can say that my frittata was very much delicious and flavorfull with a bread-like crispness to the outer edges. I was very satisfied with the results.
 

caseydog

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By all means do whatever you want, you are the one in charge and I believe in experimentation. Personally I wouldn't have done that. Instead just used a frying pan that I would suspect would give me a depth that would resemble what a frittata would look like and in this case a smaller fry pan. I would have sauteed the tomato and garlic in your recipe then added the eggs, then the prosciutto, cheese and herbs and just cook the bottom slightly then put in a 400 degree oven to finish. Those eggs would have puffed up easily and probably given you a better result. Just my opinion.

Yep. My though was exactly the same -- use a smaller pan to get more depth from a small amount of eggs. I agree with the rest of your observations, too. Perhaps there will be a version 2.0 of this frittata. The ingredients sound good, otherwise.

CD
 

caseydog

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You might be right on that score. When I researched frittatas, which I've never made before, I've found a mix of different approaches. And cast iron deep frying pans were often recommended to get the frittata done quicker with a better rise or puff. Next time I do a frittata, I will try a different method. I can say that my frittata was very much delicious and flavorfull with a bread-like crispness to the outer edges. I was very satisfied with the results.

A first time is a first time. In cooking, as opposed to explosives, you get many chances to get it right. :wink:

CD
 
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