kaneohegirlinaz

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I found this recipe when I was searching the WWW for something different to make for dinner.
I clipped it from the Honolulu Star Bulletin, circa 2008.
It’s a different way to serve Beef Steak, whether it’s Flank, Tri Tip, Strip,
Sirloin or Skirt.
This recipe is adapted from “Favorite Island Cookery Book IV” Honpa Hongwanji Hawaii Betsuin (1985).
I put my own twist on it.


Hawaii-Style Chopped Steak

serves 2

Ingredients:

1/2 lb. Beef Steak, thinly sliced across the grain
1 Tbsp. Vegetable Oil
1 C. Sweet Bell Peppers, sliced
1 C. Sweet White Onion, sliced 1/4 inch thick, from "pole to pole"
1 tsp. Corn Starch
1 tsp. Water
1/2 C. Chicken Broth - optional

Seasoning:

1/4 C. Soy Sauce
3 tsp. granulated Sugar
1 scant tsp. Rice Vinegar (unseasoned)
1-inch piece Ginger Root, peeled and grated
1 clove Garlic, grated or minced, approximately 1 tsp.

Method:

Combine seasoning ingredients. Add Beef and marinate 20 minutes.

Heat oil in pan over med-high; add Peppers Onions and, cook until barely soft/crisp tender. Remove to a plate.

Place Beef in pan, along with the Seasoning. Stir-fry until cooked through (cooked to Mid-rare). Remove, leaving seasoning liquid in pan.

Combine cornstarch and water; stir until smooth. Add to Seasoning liquid and simmer until thickened.

If the Sauce is too thick for your liking, add in the Broth and stir again. (I wanted some gravy for the Rice)

Return Beef, Peppers and onions to pan to heat back through.

IMG_0185.JPG
 

Morning Glory

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This recipe could have walked out of a good Chinese restaurant here. I hadn't realised that Hawaiian food could be so close to that type of cuisine. But that was my ignorance because I've now realised that the plantations brought immigrant workers from China to Hawaii in the 19th century. I always think of the slave trade as being African but of course other nationalities were traded, exploited and also made their mark on the cuisine of the regions they ended up in.
 

kaneohegirlinaz

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This recipe could have walked out of a good Chinese restaurant here. I hadn't realised that Hawaiian food could be so close to that type of cuisine. But that was my ignorance because I've now realised that the plantations brought immigrant workers from China to Hawaii in the 19th century. I always think of the slave trade as being African but of course other nationalities were traded, exploited and also made their mark on the cuisine of the regions they ended up in.
That's right MG!
Immigrants from many different countries came to Hawaii to work in both the Sugar and Pineapple plantations.
My Paternal Great-Grandparents came to The Island of Hawaii from The Azores and Sweden.
So the cuisine of Hawaii is quite varied, a little of this, a little of that, and they all used what they had or could get in Hawaii. It wasn't quite like what they'd made back home. It then became Hawaii-Style foods, or as we call them Local-Style, it's not traditional Hawaiian food though, that's a whole different bag of beans.

<edit - and MAHALO, thanks MG for that nod>

Looks like shaved steak, the kind that's used to make pepper-steak subs!! :whistling:
I do slice the steak nice and thin so that it will remain tender, but not nearly as thin as say Steak-ums, but I do have some in the freezer :wink:
 

garlichead

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This recipe could have walked out of a good Chinese restaurant here. I hadn't realised that Hawaiian food could be so close to that type of cuisine. But that was my ignorance because I've now realised that the plantations brought immigrant workers from China to Hawaii in the 19th century. I always think of the slave trade as being African but of course other nationalities were traded, exploited and also made their mark on the cuisine of the regions they ended up in.
It's actually exactly like a Chinese food recipe would be formulated. To make it Hawaiian I'd probably add something indigenous or profoundly Hawaiian and I'd probably add pineapple or Spam maybe. Cheers
 
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