Hemulen

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Hem's Chutney
chu_6.jpg

A small jar (175-230 ml/0.75-1 cup) of chutney | Preparation & cooking time 1.5 hours


Ingredients
50 g (~1.8 oz/a small bunch) of scallions​
1 shallot​
3 cloves of garlic​
50 ml (~0.2 cups/24 g/0.8 oz) fresh or frozen red currants​
1 medium-sized red apple (e.g. Organic Red Delicious)​
50 ml (~0.2 cup/42.5 g/1.5 oz) jelling sugar (with pectin)​
2 teaspoons white miso paste​
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar​
1 teaspoon chil(l)i flakes​
1 teaspoon jalapeño flakes​
1 teaspoon brown mustard seeds​
1 teaspoon salt​
500 ml/g (~1.7 cups/17 fl oz) water​

Instructions

Mince/cut the scallions, shallot and garlic. Quarter and deseed an apple and cut it into small bits; don't peel. Mix all ingredients in a high-edged (non-stick) frying pan/skillet. Let simmer on low heat for about 1 h 10 min or until the texture is sufficiently jellified. Rinse a clean, suitable glass jar/container with boiling water, pour the chutney into the hot jar, close the lid (line a metallic or plastic lid with parchment paper), let cool, refridgerate and use within 2-3 weeks. Serve as an accompaniment with any savo(u)ry dish.

chu_a.png
 

MypinchofItaly

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Hem's Chutney
View attachment 56037
A small jar (175-230 ml/0.75-1 cup) of chutney | Preparation & cooking time 1.5 hours


Ingredients
50 g (~1.8 oz/a small bunch) of scallions​
1 shallot​
3 cloves of garlic​
50 ml (~0.2 cups/24 g/0.8 oz) fresh or frozen red currants​
1 medium-sized red apple (e.g. Organic Red Delicious)​
50 ml (~0.2 cup/42.5 g/1.5 oz) jelling sugar (with pectin)​
2 teaspoons white miso paste​
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar​
1 teaspoon chil(l)i flakes​
1 teaspoon jalapeño flakes​
1 teaspoon brown mustard seeds​
1 teaspoon salt​
500 ml/g (~1.7 cups/17 fl oz) water​

Instructions

Mince/cut the scallions, shallot and garlic. Quarter and deseed an apple and cut it into small bits; don't peel. Mix all ingredients in a high-edged (non-stick) frying pan/skillet. Let simmer on low heat for about 1 h 10 min or until the texture is sufficiently jellified. Rinse a clean, suitable glass jar/container with boiling water, pour the chutney into the hot jar, close the lid (line a metallic or plastic lid with parchment paper), let cool, refridgerate and use within 2-3 weeks. Serve as an accompaniment with any savo(u)ry dish.

View attachment 56038

Looks and sounds delicious 👏🏻
 

mjd

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I don't understand this part...

"close the lid (line a metallic or plastic lid with parchment paper)".

I typically use Mason jars for this kind of thing. What is the purpose of using parchment paper?
 

Hemulen

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I don't understand this part...

"close the lid (line a metallic or plastic lid with parchment paper)".

I typically use Mason jars for this kind of thing. What is the purpose of using parchment paper?
If there's an uncoated metal lid (other than stainless steel which tolerates acids) in the jar, the metal can react with the acid in the chutney and give a metallic taste to the product (through dissolving and/or corrosion). It's the same as not cooking acidic food in aluminium pots or pans. If there's a rubber/plastic lid or seal in straight contact with the chutney, the acidic taste can stick to the rubber/plastic. The parchment paper acts as a protective covering, although the protective effect is assumably moderate or minor. Contemporary Mason jars create a tight vacuum (hermetic seal) which is not essential for short time preservation of chutneys in the fridge but better for e.g. jams and sealed pickled goods stored for a long period of time in the fridge (or in pantries, basements or other semi-cool storage spaces). The lids of Mason jars are intended for single-use when canning.
 
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mjd

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If there's an uncoated metal lid (other than stainless steel which tolerates acids) in the jar, the metal can react with the acid in the chutney and give a metallic taste to the product (through dissolving and/or corrosion). It's the same as not cooking acidic food in aluminium pots or pans. If there's a rubber/plastic lid or seal in straight contact with the chutney, the acidic taste can stick to the rubber/plastic. The parchment paper acts as a protective covering, although the protective effect is assumably moderate or minor. Contemporary Mason jars create a tight vacuum (hermetic seal) which is not essential for short time preservation of chutneys in the fridge but better for e.g. jams and sealed pickled goods stored for a long period of time in the fridge (or in pantries, basements or other semi-cool storage spaces). The lids of Mason jars are intended for single-use when canning.
Got it. You are a wealth of information and creative cooking ideas! Thanks for taking the time to explain this.
 

Morning Glory

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This looks rather pretty as chutneys go! It sounds delicious with a good balance of hot and sour tastes. I also like the way its an all in one cooking method. The white miso is intriguing. I'm think it adds a bit of a umami depth of flavour?
 

Hemulen

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This looks rather pretty as chutneys go! It sounds delicious with a good balance of hot and sour tastes. I also like the way its an all in one cooking method. The white miso is intriguing. I'm think it adds a bit of a umami depth of flavour?
Yes, soy & rice -based white miso is sweet and mild but it has a distinct fermented note with lots of umami.
 
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